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Download Foundations of Library and Information Science eBook

by Richard Rubin

Download Foundations of Library and Information Science eBook
ISBN:
1555704026
Author:
Richard Rubin
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Neal Schuman Pub; Updated edition (August 2000)
Pages:
495 pages
EPUB book:
1258 kb
FB2 book:
1340 kb
DJVU:
1564 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
814


Library and information science students and professionals will find the background and concepts they . So I read this book for my Foundations of Library and Information Science class and I have to say that it's quite enjoyable.

So I read this book for my Foundations of Library and Information Science class and I have to say that it's quite enjoyable. Yes, the statistics and data in the book is a bit out of date but it still carries a lot of relevant information such as the history of library science as a profession.

Richard E. Rubin served as Director of the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, from, and subsequently became Associate Provost for Extended (Online) Education at KSU until his retirement in 2013

Richard E. Rubin served as Director of the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, from, and subsequently became Associate Provost for Extended (Online) Education at KSU until his retirement in 2013. He received his AB in Philosophy from Oberlin College, his MLS from Kent State University, and his PhD from the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader. I believe all of this is doable, if we pull together to create the internet as it was meant to b. .

A librarian is a person who works professionally in a library, and may hold a degree in librarianship (known either as library science or library and information science). Traditionally, a librarian is associated with collections of books, as demonstrated by the etymology of the word "librarian" (from the Latin liber, "book"). The role of a librarian is continually evolving to meet social and technological needs.

Information Policy as Library Policy: Intellectual Freedom The Values and Ethics of Library and Information .

Rubin observes in his preface, 'Our profession demands constant growth, continuous learning, and very open minds.

Richard E. Rubin served as Director of the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, from 1999–2010, and subsequently became Associate Provost for Extended (Online) Education at KSU until his retirement in 2013. He received his AB in Philosophy from Oberlin College, his MLS from Kent State University, and his PhD from the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

to academic, school, and special, this book illuminates the major facets of library and information science for aspiring professionals as well as those already practicing in the field.

to academic, school, and special, this book illuminates the major facets of library and information science for aspiring professionals as well as those already practicing in the field.

This is the revised edition of the first textbook specifically written to cover the fundamentals of library and information science programs. Designed as a highly current teaching resource, Rubin offers library and information science students and professionals the background and techniques they need to meet today's - and tomorrow's - challenges.

Foundations of Library and Information Science begins with a discussion of the practice of librarianship, and moves on to address the place of libraries within the broader perspective of the information superstructure, the development of information science, the growth of information technologies, information policy in libraries, intellectual organization of libraries (from classification systems to databases), the mission of libraries from past to present, and ethical aspects and principles between information providers and clients. The various types of libraries (public, academic, school, and special), their internal functions, and the major organizational issues they face are discussed.

This comprehensive text contains an extensive list of selected readings. Appendixes include the Association of Research Libraries Statement on Intellectual Property; Development of the National Information Infrastructure; a bill of rights and responsibilities for electronic learners; major periodicals, indexes, encyclopedias and dictionaries in library and information science; and a listing of associations.

  • Mash
I was assigned the Third Edition (2010) of Richard Rubin’s textbook Foundations of Library and Information Science for a course in my first semester of a Master of Library Science degree program. Anytime I see the word “Foundations” in a textbook title I prepare myself for a yawnfest. The word usually signifies a broad but shallow overview of a subject that cursorily and dryly touches on a lot of topics without providing enough detail to render any of them interesting. Not so with Rubin’s book. It provides an excellent overview of the library and information sciences and does so in an engaging and stimulating manner.

LIS is a pretty diverse discipline, encompassing a lot of occupations and areas of scholarship, but Rubin manages to give them all their fair due. He provides a comprehensive overview of this broad field of study, but also succeeds in exploring the subject in satisfying depth, delving into matters of both theory and practice. While I was reading the book, every time I thought to myself, “but what about this?” sure enough, within a few pages Rubin had answered my question. The writing is crystal clear and concise and doesn’t put the reader to sleep. In fact, his text is often engaging and inspires enthusiasm for the profession. Although the intended audience is students just starting out on the road to librarianship, Rubin’s take on the profession is neither pat-ourselves-on-the-back congratulatory nor rosily optimistic. He gives a balanced perspectives on the pros and cons of library work and doesn’t shy away from discussing the challenges librarians face in the Digital Age.

The organization and design of the book is very user-friendly, with lots of helpful lists and tables. The text is logically subdivided under multiple levels of subheads, making it easy to find or refind what you’re looking for. I could likely use this book as a reference for every paper I write over the course of my masters program, if for nothing else than to consult its lists of sources and selected readings. I rented this book, but I wish I would have bought it. Too bad its so pricey. I would gladly buy an e-book edition, if the publisher would make one available.
  • Hbr
Neal-Schumann books hold the market on Information and Library Science textbooks and during most of my MLS classes, very few of their books were digitally available, so I got the HC textbook. I got a very good price here at Amazon compared to the school bookstore, and the used textbooks are generally in pretty good shape at Amazon so I always check here for textbooks.

The book itself was thorough, although class lectures largely addressed the same content. My main complaint is the very small typesetting and much of the information in this authors' textbooks is repetitive - which makes some sense for introductory classes but there was a fair amount of overlap, I didn't end up using the actual textbook that much as the content was largely covered within my other classes that semester. Might be of more use if you are taking one class per semester instead of a full courseload.
  • Kerry
I was the only one in my class to read the whole book over the summer. I learned a lot but felt silly when I raised my hand and no one else did. Yes, I'm a geek.
  • Kabandis
Had to buy this for school for a Masters program. Usually I would consider renting books. But this one I am glad I purchased. Rubin does a good job giving a well rounded view of the past, present and future of the Library professional. It is an easy read and not overly technical like some. The references to scholarly journals in each chapter alone are worthwhile if you need more info on a particular chapter topic. Glad I purchased this one. I know I will go back to it for reference.
  • Steamy Ibis
Standard well-known textbook for MLIS and some library tech classes. I covered my paperback copy with book tape because you will be referring to this book a lot during your studies.
  • Drelajurus
The book was helpful because it was a required text for my course. However, I give it three stars because it was sticky and I had to wipe it clean. Another drawback is you can't highlight or make any notes in the book.
  • Priotian
It's a textbook, great. No really it is a nice resource, my prof thinks it's a little outdated even though it is the current edition but I don't mind it at all.
had to have this for school. it was okay. i would say for the subject matter, it was pretty easy to read and had enough flow and design so you would not get bored.

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