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Download American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) eBook

by Kevin K. Gaines

Download American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) eBook
ISBN:
0807830089
Author:
Kevin K. Gaines
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press; First Edition edition (April 17, 2006)
Pages:
360 pages
EPUB book:
1693 kb
FB2 book:
1876 kb
DJVU:
1128 kb
Other formats
mobi doc mbr rtf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
760


In American Africans in Ghana, Kevin Gaines offers a richly detailed portrait of the community that gathered in Ghana around Nkrumah.

In American Africans in Ghana, Kevin Gaines offers a richly detailed portrait of the community that gathered in Ghana around Nkrumah. American Africans in Ghana is much more than a story of . black expatriates in Ghana, although that remains a central theme.

major African American sojourners and visitors, the. book explores such key events as the 1958 All-Africa. BRINGING THE STUDY OF PAN-AFRICANISM BACK TO AFRICA - American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era. By GainesKevin . . Peoples’ Conference, the founding of the radical Casa-. blanca group of African states, and United Nations in-. tervention and the political crisis in Congo, examining. these not only as key moments in the history of modern.Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006.

American Africans in Ghana book. by civil rights reform legislation. When the West African nation of Ghana gained its independence from British colonial rule in 1957, people of African descent the world over celebrated the new nation as a beacon for their aspirations for freedom and self-determination. Over the next decade, hundreds of African Americans-including Martin Luther King J. George Padmore, W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Pauli Murray, C. L. R. James, and Muhammad Ali-visited or settled in Ghana.

book by Kevin K. Gaines. In 1957 Ghana became one of the first sub-Saharan African nations to gain independence from colonial rule .

The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005. xiv + 342 pp. Photographs. After a pair of broad chapters introducing the Ghanaian context and international Afro-diasporic thought from 1900 to 1950, Gaines's book focuses most intensely on the period from March 1957 (when independent Ghana under Nkrumah galvanized the entire African and Afro-diasporic world) to February 1966 (when Nkrumah, while visiting China, lost power in a coup).

Kevin K. Gaines explains what attracted these Americans to Ghana and how their . Nkrumah the Expatriates and Postindependence Ghana 19571960. Gaines explains what attracted these Americans to Ghana and how their new community was shaped by the convergence of the Cold War, the rise of the . civil rights movement, and the decolonization of Africa. Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana's president, posed a direct challenge to . hegemony by promoting a vision of African liberation, continental unity, and West Indian federation. 77. The Congo Crisis and an African American Womans Dilemma. 110. Julian Mayfield and the Radical Afros. 136. 6 Malcolm X in Ghana.

In 1957 Ghana became one of the first sub-Saharan African nations to gain independence from colonial rule. About the author (2006). Kevin K. Gaines is director of the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies and professor of history at the University of Michigan

In 1957 Ghana became one of the first sub-Saharan African nations to gain independence from colonial rule. George Padmore, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Paul. Gaines is director of the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies and professor of history at the University of Michigan. He is author of the award-winning Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture during the Twentieth Century. Bibliographic information.

American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era. The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture.

His book, American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era (UNC Press, 2006) .

His book, American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era (UNC Press, 2006) was a Choice Outstanding Academic Title. He is a past president of the American Studies Association (2009-10).

American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Er. Although the number of African American expatriates in Ghana was small, in espousing a transnational American citizenship defined.

American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era. by Kevin K. Although the number of African American expatriates in Ghana was small, in espousing a transnational American citizenship defined by solidarities with African peoples, these activists along with their allies in the United States waged a fundamental, if largely forgotten, struggle over the meaning and content of the cornerstone of American citizenship-the right to vote-conferred on African Americans.

In 1957 Ghana became one of the first sub-Saharan African nations to gain independence from colonial rule. Over the next decade, hundreds of African Americans--including Martin Luther King Jr., George Padmore, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Pauli Murray, and Muhammad Ali--visited or settled in Ghana. Kevin K. Gaines explains what attracted these Americans to Ghana and how their new community was shaped by the convergence of the Cold War, the rise of the U.S. civil rights movement, and the decolonization of Africa. Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana's president, posed a direct challenge to U.S. hegemony by promoting a vision of African liberation, continental unity, and West Indian federation. Although the number of African American expatriates in Ghana was small, in espousing a transnational American citizenship defined by solidarities with African peoples, these activists along with their allies in the United States waged a fundamental, if largely forgotten, struggle over the meaning and content of the cornerstone of American citizenship--the right to vote--conferred on African Americans by civil rights reform legislation.When the West African nation of Ghana gained its independence from British colonial rule in 1957, people of African descent the world over celebrated the new nation as a beacon for their aspirations for freedom and self-determination. Over the next decade, hundreds of African Americans--including Martin Luther King Jr., George Padmore, W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Pauli Murray, C. L. R. James, and Muhammad Ali--visited or settled in Ghana. Kevin K. Gaines explains what attracted these expatriates to Ghana and how their new community was shaped by the convergence of the Cold War, the rise of the U.S. civil rights movement, and the decolonization of Africa. -->
  • Maximilianishe
Kevin Gaines provides a detailed, personal but objectively written, history of the motivations, experiences, disappointments, triumps, and contributions of African Americans who went to Ghana in the 1950-80s. Their reasons included seeking a better life away from the oppressive discrimination and second-class citizenship in America or/as well as to participate along with Ghanaians in the building of the post-Independence Ghana. Experiences and visits of many travelers such as Maya Angelou, Malcolm X, Julian Mayfield (Gaines includes a lot about him), St. Clair Drake, Robert Lee, among others are told from someone who seems to be a close associate or confidante. The Epilogue looks at current relationships and encounters of African Americans in Ghana (including immigrants and culture/historical tourists). It ends with a challenge as well as a prescription for the expansion of what it means to be African American citizen of the U.S., of Africa, and the world.
  • Daizil
American Africans in Ghana by Kevin K. Gaines is similar to a previous book that I reviewed in that it traces the African American expatriate community in Ghana. Rather than treat them as a group, however, this book focuses on individuals and their personal experiences in the country. This approach has its strengths and weaknesses and this book shows both. The main problem with focusing on just a handful of people is that it is hard to get enough documentable evidence of their feeling and reasons for their actions in Ghana. The author is forced to speculate on the subjects' motives. The mail problem is that for one who is not all that familiar with the history of Ghana before the coup, it is hard to follow what is going on in the country as a whole. That being said there are also many advantages.
By focusing on individuals, the author can delve into question that would be more of a challenge just looking through the macro picture. Questions such as what role can these expatriates play in Ghana and how do they stay in contact with what is going on back in the U.S. are asked by the author. An especially interesting part of the book for me was the description of how many such as Richard Wright had trouble adjusting to life in Africa and in the end failed to achieve the feeling of home coming that many left the states to do.
While this book does tend to drag in places it is interesting and would be a useful resource for anyone wanting to learn more about the people profiled and question like where do African Americans fit into the larger African Diaspora community. This book sheds some light on some prominent African American leaders in a part of their lives that is seldom seen.
  • Zicelik
This is a fascinating book that draws on lots of unpublished and rare sources from the early days of Ghanian independence and its political intertwinement with the aims of African American radicals of the era. Gaines' work adds a wonderful international context to the American civil rights movement, and I'm glad I found this book when searching for a political history of Ghana.