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Download From Revolution to Rights in South Africa: Social Movements, NGOs and Popular Politics After Apartheid eBook

by Steven L. Robins

Download From Revolution to Rights in South Africa: Social Movements, NGOs and Popular Politics After Apartheid eBook
ISBN:
1847012019
Author:
Steven L. Robins
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
BOYE6; Reprint edition (November 18, 2010)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1306 kb
FB2 book:
1746 kb
DJVU:
1959 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
248


The role that COSATU now plays in the post-apartheid political dispensation is changing

The role that COSATU now plays in the post-apartheid political dispensation is changing. The essential conditions of labour subordination therefore remain, only now overlain at a national level with a social democratic.

In South Africa responses to HIV/AIDS have included forms of activism .

In South Africa responses to HIV/AIDS have included forms of activism that, like the transnational housing activism case study in Chapter 4, could best be described as ‘globalisation from below’ (Appadurai 2001). The AIDS pandemic in South Africa has contributed towards prising open questions on sexuality and sexual rights in ways that were unprecedented in the past Save.

The book deals with the rights-based political strategies employed by post-apartheid NGOs and social movements, particularly in the form of what the author calls NGO-social movement strategic partnerships.

From Revolution to Rights in South Africa: Social Movements, NGOs and Popular Politics after Apartheid. Woodbridge: James Currey, 2008. The book deals with the rights-based political strategies employed by post-apartheid NGOs and social movements, particularly in the form of what the author calls NGO-social movement strategic partnerships. The case studies are used to make the broad argument that rights talk has replaced revolutionary talk in the political discourses and the strategies employed by such partnerships.

in South Africa was further deepened a 'palace coup' and a dramatic routing of President mbeki and his. From Revolution to Rights in South Africa: Social Movements, NGOs and Popular Politics After. 68 MB·14 Downloads·New! claiming rights Stochastic equations through the eye of the physicist basic concepts, exact results and asymptotic. 81 MB·10,562 Downloads·New! Fluctuating parameters appear in a variety of physical systems and phenomena.

Southern Africa: University of KwaZulu-Natal Press (PB). Categories: Other Social Sciences\Politics.

Robins argues for the continued importance of NGOs, social movements and other 'civil society' actors in creating new forms of citizenship and democracy. He goes beyond the sanitised prescriptions of 'good governance' so often touted by development agencies. Instead he argues for a complex, hybrid and ambiguous relationship between civil society and the state, where new negotiations around citizenship emerge. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Cambridge Core - African Government, Politics and Policy - From Revolution to Rights in South Africa . Critics of liberalism in Europe and North America argue that a stress on 'rights talk' and identity politics has led to fragmentation, individualisation and depoliticisation.

Cambridge Core - African Government, Politics and Policy - From Revolution to Rights in South Africa - by Steven L. Robins. But are these developments really signs of 'the end of politics'? In the post-colonial, post-apartheid, neo-liberal new South Africa poor and marginalised citizens continue to struggle for land, housing and health care. They must respond to uncertainty and radical contingencies on a daily basis.

Critics of liberalism in Europe and North America argue that a stress on 'rights talk' and identity politics has led to fragmentation, individualisation and depoliticisation. They must respond to uncertainty and radical contingencies on a daily basis

Critics of liberalism in Europe and North America argue that a stress on 'rights talk' and identity politics has led to fragmentation, individualisation and depoliticisation. But are these developments really signs of 'the end of politics'? In the post-colonial, post-apartheid, neo-liberal new South Africa poor and marginalised citizens continue to struggle for land, housing and health care. They must respond to uncertainty and radical contingencies on a daily basis. This requires multiple strategies, an engaged, practised citizenship, one that links the daily struggle to well organised mobilisation around claiming rights. Robins argues for the continued importance of NGOs, social movements and other 'civil society' actors in creating new forms of citizenship and democracy. He goes beyond the sanitised prescriptions of 'good governance' so often touted by development agencies. Instead he argues for a complex, hybrid and ambiguous relationship between civil society and the state, where new negotiations around citizenship emerge. Steven L. Robins is Professor of Social Anthropology in the University of Stellenbosch and editor of Limits to Liberation after Apartheid (James Currey). Southern Africa (South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Lesotho, Swaziland): University of KwaZulu-Natal Press (PB)