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by Alice Walker

Download The Same River Twice eBook
ISBN:
0753819597
Author:
Alice Walker
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Phoenix (an Imprint of The Orion Publishing Group Ltd ); New Ed edition (October 20, 2005)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1762 kb
FB2 book:
1319 kb
DJVU:
1659 kb
Other formats
doc lrf azw txt
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
961


Alice Walker won the Pulitzer prize and the American Book Award for THE COLOR PURPLE

It's been ten years since the movie version of Walker's controversial Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Color Purple, debuted in theaters across the country. Alice Walker won the Pulitzer prize and the American Book Award for THE COLOR PURPLE. She is the author of many bestselling novels, essays and collections of poetry including MERIDIAN, BY THE LIGHT OF MY FATHER'S SMILE and THE THIRD LIFE OF GRANGE COPELAND.

The Same River Twice" was a very good book and it gave so much insight into who Alice Walker is as a person. I never knew that Ms. Walker has Lyme disease and that she loved to garden

The Same River Twice" was a very good book and it gave so much insight into who Alice Walker is as a person. Walker has Lyme disease and that she loved to garden. The casting of certain individuals in certain roles shocked me it never dawned on that Tina Turner was their first choice in playing Shug Avery and that Lola Folana and Diana Ross were also considered for the part. When I finally saw the movie after it had been out on video cassette three years later I was shocked and enlightened all at the same moment. I was shocked at seeing two women kiss and enlightened to see Celie break away from her abusive husband and flourish as person.

The Same River Twice book. The Same River Twice" is an exciting collection of work based on Alice Walker's groundbreaking, Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "The Color Purple. It includes the never-used screenplay Walker wrote, never-before-seen diary entries and letters, as well as new writings by the author on such topics as art, motherhood, illness, and relationships. Walker also discusses, for the "The Same River Twice" is an exciting collection of work based on Alice Walker's groundbreaking, Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "The Color Purple.

Alice Walker (born February 9, 1944) is an American novelist, short story writer, poet, and social activist

Alice Walker (born February 9, 1944) is an American novelist, short story writer, poet, and social activist. In 1982, she wrote the novel The Color Purple, for which she won the National Book Award for hardcover fiction, and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. She also wrote the novels Meridian (1976) and The Third Life of Grange Copeland (1970). An avowed feminist, Walker coined the term womanist to mean "A black feminist or feminist of color" in 1983.

The Same River Twice : Honoring the Difficult. In the early eightiesm three extraordinary events interrupted Alice Walker's peaceful, reclusive life-the publication of the bestselling novel The Color Purple, the Pulitzer Prize, and an offer from Spielberg to make her novel into a film. This book chronicles that period of transition from recluse to public figure, and invites us to contemplate, along with her, the true significance of unanticipated gifts.

The Same River Twice exposes Walker to criticism only because it exposes Walker

The Same River Twice exposes Walker to criticism only because it exposes Walker. She tells of her battle with Lyme disease, her breakup with a longtime lover, her earth-based spirituality; she apologizes for none of it. Walker is a fascinating literary figure, and it is not arrogant to assume that anyone is interested in such details if her readers are, in fact, eager for such disclosures. Beyond that, The Same River Twice brilliantly unveils an artist’s pain and joy at seeing her work take on a surprising life of its own. For writers and artists, it is full of valuable insights.

In the early 1980s, The Color Purple was a runaway success, it had won the Pulitzer Prize and Steven Spielberg was making the book into a film.

The real story behind the making of THE COLOR PURPLE in the author's own words In the early 1980s, The Color Purple was. In the early 1980s, The Color Purple was a runaway success, it had won the Pulitzer Prize and Steven Spielberg was making the book into a film. Yet behind all the critical success, Alice Walker suffered an extreme backlash as she became the object of attacks both personal and political. Her detractors claimed that she hated black men, that her work was injurious to black male and female relationships; and that her ideas about equality were harmful to the black community.

The Same River Twice. Compare and contrast Walker's book The Color Purple with the film. What are the similarities and differences between Walker's book and her own screenplay?

The Same River Twice. What are the similarities and differences between Walker's book and her own screenplay? How are Walker's screenplay and Meyjes' screenplay similar? How are they different? When Walker first viewed the film, The Color Purple, in a huge theater with only two other people, "everything about it seemed wrong," she said. But at the premiere in New York, with a magic wand in hand, she watched the film in a packed theater and was able to say she loved the film.

Author: Alice Walker ISBN 10: 0753819597. Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book. There will be no stains or markings on the book, the cover is clean and crisp, the book will look unread, the only marks there may be are slight bumping marks to the edges of the book where it may have been on a shelf previously. Read full description. See details and exclusions. The Same River Twice by Alice Walker (Paperback, 2005). Pre-owned: lowest price.

  • fabscf
Reading Walker's prose can be like talking with a live person face to face. There is no aloof distance between Walker and the reader, one feels that she is addressing them personally; the drawback to this is that when she says something you may not agree with, you can feel a little hurt or even betrayed. The Color Purple is a story that so many people lay "claim" to, and is one of the most important books of the twentieth century. Readership of the novel has only grown since its initial publication in 1982, and it's no wonder that Walker feels such a bond to this story of hers. The problem is that the rights were sold to make a movie version and Walker wasn't entirely pleased with the results.
While I am sure any writer would feel very ambivalent about a film version of their novel (as Ken Kesey did for "Cuckoo's Nest"), when one signs the film rights away, they should brace themselves for the disappointment. Walker takes us step-by-step through the disappointment but the final conclusion is a feeling of ingratitude. What is important to me is that because of the movie I became aware of the book and thus began my love for Alice Walker. As a teen I loved the movie, but being older now I do see many moments in the film as rather embarrassing. But again, had it not been for the film I would not have read the book.
But why did Walker choose to write this book? Parts of it are very interesting, but much of the book is just a bunch of journal entries and news clippings. Walker does submit her entire screenplay that she proposed; Her screenplay is actually less streamlined than the script that made it to the screen and has too many moments involving the patterns in a quilt that stop the story dead in its tracks. For all the flaws of the screenplay that was adapted, (and there are many), it's a much less rambling script than Walkers.
Despite Walker's intentions, the book comes off as ungrateful. After all, she was able to make a nice home for herself. But this book is interesting to see the author's point of view. Had Purple been made in the 50's, it would have been damaged beyond repair and probably taken the point of view of one of the minor white characters ... if it would have been made at all. We've all seen movies that ruined a book, Walker is one of the only ones who has been voal about it.
But Walker should also take heart, at least she didn't write "Beloved" and watch that transition to the screen.
  • Cyregaehus
This book is not for everyone. I found this book extremely intimate and amazing. Why? I enjoy "getting to know" my favorite authors in a way that depicts them as "human just like you and me." Alice Walker let's us into her mind and emotions. She shows us that behind her great literary talent, she too goes through self-doubt, worry about what "other people think", etc.

I remember when The Color Purple movie was released and the backlash it got from black men in my community who perceived it as "male hating." I always wondered what it was like to put your heart and soul into a literary piece, have hollywood create a visual experience out of it in a way that you didn't expect, then sit through people "attacking" you as a "black male hater." Well, this book reveals what Alice went through, emotionally, spiritually and psychologically. We get to read exerpts from her journal. Furthermore, I felt more connected to this book than perhaps other readers because I myself am a novelist writer trying to publish my first book. Alice Walker brought up "controversial issues" in the book, The Color Purple (the most controversial being the "lesbian" relationship between Celie and Shug). My own work brings up "taboo" subjects within the black community. Reading Walker's intimate experiences with the public's (and her family and friends') reactions to her work and her bravery to "keep on keepin' on", inspired me to continue writing about subjects that have often been "silenced" within my own black community. The Same River Twice is an excellent book for someone such as myself who is often intimidated and worried about how their community may respond to their literary pieces.
  • Steamy Ibis
"The Same River Twice" was a very good book and it gave so much insight into who Alice Walker is as a person. I never knew that Ms. Walker has Lyme disease and that she loved to garden. The casting of certain individuals in certain roles shocked me it never dawned on that Tina Turner was their first choice in playing Shug Avery and that Lola Folana and Diana Ross were also considered for the part. Also I did not know that Ms. Walker had a problem completing the screenplay for the actual movie due her disease. Ms. Walker is one of the best authors of our time and it is a shame that people cannot see the beauty in her work.
I do remember all of the controversy surrounding "The Color Purple" when I was a teenager and how I was forbidden to see the movie. When I finally saw the movie after it had been out on video cassette three years later I was shocked and enlightened all at the same moment. I was shocked at seeing two women kiss and enlightened to see Celie break away from her abusive husband and flourish as person. The book and the movie are different and people should read the book before passing judgement on Ms. Walker's character if they have only seen the movie. I know now Ms. Walker had somewhat of a different vision of her book being made into a movie than Steven.
  • Mojar
I love Alice Walker. Most of her novels have made a huge impact on my life, The Color Purple included. Having said that, I must confess that Same River Twice disappointed me. It contains journal entries that I'd be just as happy not knowing about, Walker's version of her screenplay adaptation of Purple, and numerous insights about death, dying, and spirituality. She writes somewhere that her daughter, Rebecca, had urged her to publish this book as a small, quiet tome, with little or no publicity, for those only interested in knowing every personal detail that went along with producing this infamous movie. I wish she had followed this advice. It is a sweet book, especially for those who have suffered with Lyme Disease, but those interested in Walker's immense literary talent, this is not the book for you. Celebrity tidbits, morning affirmations, and light-weight commentaries on being an African-American mother, daughter, woman are its strengths.