almediah.fr
» » Yakuza Diary: Doing Time in the Japanese Underworld

Download Yakuza Diary: Doing Time in the Japanese Underworld eBook

by Christopher Seymour

Download Yakuza Diary: Doing Time in the Japanese Underworld eBook
ISBN:
087113604X
Author:
Christopher Seymour
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Atlantic Monthly Pr; 1st edition (August 1, 1996)
Pages:
212 pages
EPUB book:
1785 kb
FB2 book:
1535 kb
DJVU:
1133 kb
Other formats
mbr lrf doc azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
230


In the spring of 1993, freelance writer Christopher Seymour talked his way out of the grasp of a suspicious immigration official just in time to extend his stay in Japan during a. .Christopher Seymour wrote an exciting book

In the spring of 1993, freelance writer Christopher Seymour talked his way out of the grasp of a suspicious immigration official just in time to extend his stay in Japan during a countrywide yakuza (organized crime) gang war. From the opening pages of Yakuza Diary, his lighthearted enthusiasm is infectious. As he works his way into the yakuza network of physically imposing men with full-body tattoos and a weakness for tacky golf clothes, Seymour has adventures both scary and farcical. Christopher Seymour wrote an exciting book.

Written in the tradition of Nicholas Pileggi's Wiseguy, Seymour's Yakuza Diary infiltrates the Yakuza, presenting the details of a Japanese gangsters-the Yukuza-make up the biggest, richest, and most secretive organized crime syndicates in the world. The combined Yakuza is ten times larger than the American mafia, with profits that would rival any Fortune 500 company.

Christopher Seymour wrote an exciting book I greatly admire him for doing this dangerous job. Everybody who wants to know about the hidden vital organs.

Christopher Seymour wrote an exciting book. I greatly admire him for doing this dangerous job. Everybody who wants to know about the hidden vital organs of Japanese society should read this book. Just to get an impression of how the organs work. The stuff that Japanese people won't tell you about. com User, January 31, 1999. A really good easy read. If you live in Japan this book is a must.

In Yakuza Diary, Christopher Seymour infiltrates yakuza society, presenting in vivid and often hilarious . Japanese gangsters - the yakuza - make up the biggest, richest, and most secretive organized crime syndicates in the world.

In Yakuza Diary, Christopher Seymour infiltrates yakuza society, presenting in vivid and often hilarious detail outrageous characters from a world that until now has remained modern Japan's dirty little secret.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Yakuza Diary: Doing Time in the Japanese . Yakuza Diary is a terrific first book. An engagingly written and fascinating look at the organized gangsters of Japan, the Yakuza.

Yakuza Diary is a terrific first book. Must reading for all aficionados of the criminal underworld. Yakuza Diary is one of the most exciting books ever written about Japan. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

2 people like this topic. It's free and anyone can join.

Christopher Seymour, a longhaired, Japanese-fluent, Caucasian freelance writer, befriended and spent months trailing various yakuza - from gang heads to tremulous rookies. B+. Yakuza Diary: Doing Time in the Japanese Underworld.

A freelance writer who is fluent in Japanese, Seymour lived and worked in Tokyo during the early 1990s

A freelance writer who is fluent in Japanese, Seymour lived and worked in Tokyo during the early 1990s. While there, he gained entree to several of the city's top mobs (gumi), subsequently connecting with gangs in Kyoto and Osaka. The author traces the underworld's roots back to 17th-century shogunate era, when itinerant gamblers preyed on the countryside.

"A classic work of American journalism about Japan...Yakuza Diary is an ignore masterpiece." -- Terry McNulty, OSU"Seymour's book...is absolutely fascinating... Seldom has a tourist visa been put to such good use."--Men's Journal"Christopher Seymour writes the gaudy, gritty Japan of mob bosses, tattooed punks and good time girls. Yakuza Diary is one of the most exciting books ever written about Japan."--Karl Taro Greenfeld, author of Speed Tribes"An engagingly written and fascinating look at the organized gangsters of Japan, the Yakuza.... Must reading for all aficionados of the criminal underworld."--Booklist"[Seymour's] account are always vibrant..., but his thoughtful insights into an increasingly self-possessed urban Japan balance out anything resembling cheap thrills."--Entertainment Weekly"An engaging treat.... Seymour's book succeeds in expressing how exquisitely strange the Japanese will always be to Westerners who use Western methods to understand them. We get an enthusiastic, frequently fascinating account of what it's like to be an outsider among outcasts, a loser among losers."--The Philadelphia Inquirer"Christopher Seymour's journey into Japan's netherworld is alternately funny and harrowing, and always thoroughly original. His self-effacing style makes the perfect foil for this fascinating guided tour of institutional crime and ritualized violence. Yakuza Diary is a terrific first book."--James Ledbetter, staff writer, The Village Voice"[Yakuza Diary] is a revealing glimpse of mob influence on Japanese society.... Seymour gives a colorful account of his informers and their molls, many of them foreign women, and of the more ordinary life and ambience of Tokyo."--Publishers Weekly
  • MisterQweene
I read this book years ago when it first came out. I am so grateful that Amazon still had it!
The sheer amount of facts is surprising. Further, the author gives us a real sense of what it is like inside the Yakuza......for real. There was good and bad, just as it is with any culture.
I give Me. Seymour real kudos for his persistence and courage. Very well done!
  • Fomand
I've just re-read Seymour's book, which I first read about 15 years ago. The reason I read it again is that I'm celebrating my 28th year in Japan and wanted to see how what he wrote resonates with what I know of Japan today. First of all, I read the other reviews and some seem skeptic about the fact that Seymour could actually get up close to members of the yakuza. I can tell you that it is possible. Maybe not ALL yakuza, but some are certainly approachable and for good reason. For one thing, they are human, and thus are able to react favorably to someone who kind of admires them, which is what we feel are Seymour's intentions. The other thing, is that they want to project an image of them being decent people, people who are needed in Japanese society because they take care of businesses that are down on by the average Tanaka-san...like pachiko parlors, love hotels, hostess bars, porn shops, the making of porn movies, etc.
There is very little literature in English about this subculture and so, we are grateful that Christopher has done this. What I would suggest to him, if I were to meet him, is to write an updated version of his book...interview those people he met in 1993 and see what they are doing today and how the yakuza see their future as we fast approach the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. It's a whole new world now and lots has changed since 1993!
  • Rishason
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, especially because I've been starry eyed about Japanese culture most of my life. Now I see that not all Japanese are polite, care for their elders, are artistic, follow the law, live in pretty country houses and go moon gazing. I'm sorry that Japan has such a strong mafia culture, but found it fascinating nevertheless. I am surprised that an American could talk his way into the inner workings of this culture but I tend to believe that he did and that he reported accurately. When in Japan, I will now be on the lookout for tattoos and nattily-dressed men driving expensive cars, as well as flower-arranging women women in kimonos.
  • Blackstalker
It's good.
  • Stoneshaper
Christopher Seymour wrote an exciting book. He lived with the Yakuza and actually worked for the Yakuza in order to create this great piece of fun to read literature. I greatly admire him for doing this dangerous job. Everybody who wants to know about the hidden vital organs of Japanese society should read this book. Just to get an impression of how the organs work.
  • DABY
Absolutely fascinating. Seymour manages to become friends with the most interesting and unorthodox crime group in the world without glorifying them. He meets with all kinds of people in the yakuza, from an Aizu Kotetsu newcomer to a Yamaguchi-gumi oyabun. I read it all in one night. yondekudasai!
  • Juce
I spent 10 years in Japan between 1983 and 1993 and although I don't claim to have mingled with the Yakuza, I have a hard time believing some of the stories that are spun here. First, I do not believe that a foreigner (American) would gain any significant access to the Yakuza and secondly, the tall tales of gun play are quite ludicrous. Sure, shooting does occasionally happen, but not to the extent that the author "documents". As a work of fiction, this may be acceptable, but to call it non-fiction does a disservice to the genre.
Just read it. You'll see what I mean. The book is fun, exciting, and makes you dream of what it would be like to be a gangster for a while. (maybe it is just me)