almediah.fr
» » The Writing Road to Reading : The Spalding Method of Phonics for Teaching Speech, Writing and Reading

Download The Writing Road to Reading : The Spalding Method of Phonics for Teaching Speech, Writing and Reading eBook

by Walter T. Spalding,Romalda Bishop Spalding

Download The Writing Road to Reading : The Spalding Method of Phonics for Teaching Speech, Writing and Reading eBook
ISBN:
0688100074
Author:
Walter T. Spalding,Romalda Bishop Spalding
Category:
Schools & Teaching
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperResource; 4th Rev edition (September 1990)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1128 kb
FB2 book:
1812 kb
DJVU:
1612 kb
Other formats
txt doc mbr azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
860


Spalding students perform well in the classroom and on tests-and, most important, they love to read and write.

The Spalding Method helps train the right and left sides of the brain as children see, hear, read, and write. It is cost-effective and efficient; students use pencils, paper, and their minds. Spalding students perform well in the classroom and on tests-and, most important, they love to read and write.

Spalding's book is not easy to read and absorb in my opinion This program teaches a set of 70 letter-phenome units called phonograms. This is a proven method of teaching reading dyslexics.

Spalding's book is not easy to read and absorb in my opinion. I had to read it three times before I felt like a had a really good grasp of how the method worked. Since implementing Spalding's techniques, my struggling first grader is now a second grader reading real books on the second grade level. She has made amazing progress in just a few months' time. This program teaches a set of 70 letter-phenome units called phonograms. The phonograms are correct by modern standards, in that the letters represent minimal speech units, not blends.

My kids did great with Spalding Phonics. Published by Thriftbooks

book by Romalda Bishop Spalding. My kids did great with Spalding Phonics. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago. Kids can pick up a lot more than you realize, Penelope. I learned to read using this same method, when I was a kid in the 1970's, and to this day, I never mis-spell a word, and I still remember all the markings, rule numbers, and phonics sound numbers. I have taught my own kids to read with this method, and in kinder and 1st grade, they could spell better than most 5th graders.

Spalding, Romalda Bishop On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the .

Spalding, Romalda Bishop. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. Download book The writing road to reading : the Spalding method of phonics for teaching speech, writing, and reading, by Romalda Bishop Spalding with Walter T. Spalding.

Journal of learning disabilities.

author {Romalda Bishop Spalding and Walter T. Spalding}, year {1990} }. Romalda Bishop Spalding, Walter T. Journal of learning disabilities. A Case Study of the Preventing Academic Failure Orton-Gillingham Approach With Five Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Using the Mediating Tool of Cued Speech. Jennifer L. Montgomery. Impact of the Orton-Gillingham program on the reading of students who are reading below grade level.

I learned to read using the Spalding phonics method. By age 4 I knew all of the phonograms and was reading. I can't wait to teach my kids to read with this method. I learned to read using the Spalding phonics method.

Teach Your Child To Read Fast - Free phonics books to help your c child master er. .

Teach Your Child To Read Fast - Free phonics books to help your c child master er, ur, ir, or, and ar words. TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ and Enable Your Child to Become a Fast and Fluent Reader! TEACH YOUR CHILD TO READ - These free printable phonetic books will help your child master those tricky r-controlled vowels! Super Effective Program Teaches Children Of All Ages To Read. Teach Your Child to Read - Its tricky to learn to read words with r controlled vowels. Writing Road to Reading is my go-to source for teaching the sound/symbol relationships of English.

The Spalding Method for New Paperback Book. item 2 Writing Road to Reading : The Spalding Method for Teaching Speech, Spelling,. Writing Road to Reading : The Spalding Method for Teaching Speech, Spelling,.

You'll love The Writing Road To Reading by Romalda Spalding. It is the best book for teaching reading skills, phonics, handwriting, composition, and grammar. Fastest way for kids to excel at reading. The Writing Road To Reading (WRTR, 6th E., by Mrs. Romalda Spalding and Dr. Mary North is the most thorough description of the way to teach both phonics and writing. It's also the most concise. There's one book and you can use it from K-12. You do not have to watch hours and hours of video (although that can be super helpful the first time - or take a class if you can).

Originally published in 1957, this introduction to the Spalding Method has been received more and more enthusiastically in recent years as it has been shown to work--swiftly, inexpensively and efficiently.
  • Kelenn
My six-year-old son, who is highly distractable and has Aspergers, has worked on this program for a total of 10 days now. Already I've seen enough progress to want to take the time to write a review, something I very rarely do.
A little about my son's background might be useful to parents who are shopping for programs. Thanks to the Starfall website, and (to a lesser extent) Hooked on Phonics, he had by age three acquired a strong foundation in the basic phonograms-- recognizing long and short vowel sounds, and single consonant sounds. Largely because of his hyperactivity and attention deficit however, he made zero (ZERO) reading progress at his subsequent private preschool and kindergarten programs. In kindergarten, every time he was compelled to read simple words (he would not do it on his own)he worked by sounding out letters laboriously, even if he was reading a word for the second or third time. It was not hard to see that reading was exhausting, and with his short attention span, he hated it.
As for his handwriting, he learned to write capital letters in preschool (age 5), using the Handwriting Without Tears system, but he seemed thoroughly bored with the work. At 6 in his Montessori kindergarten, he enjoyed copying words for interesting projects, but he seemed to have no fixed plan for writing any letter, and his letters looked very different from one moment to the next. His b's and d's were often reversed (he could not recognize the letters reliably), and he wrote them by attaching circles to lines ("bat-and-ball" style). His teachers, though excellent in many respects, seemed unconcerned with these bad habits. I bought embossed handwriting worksheets thinking these would be easy to trace, but when my son used regular paper he lapsed into old habits.
Recently I started searching for the program by which my elementary school taught me to read over 30 years ago. Eventually I found the Spalding Method online, and I'm pretty sure that this is the same program that challenged me when I was a kid. I don't think I leapt at the work with quite the enthusiasm the book suqgests students will have. I remember my mom thought it was over-the-top and something of a pain whenever she had to help me with homework. By the end of first grade, however, I was a good reader, and I grew up loving to read.
So, as mentioned above, my son has been working hard in this program (at home; no local schools use it) for 10 days now, which means I have been working hard, too. We are only just moving past the upper- and lower-case alphabet-writing phase, which is very rules-based, and which several times has felt excruciating. (One day my son asked if we could please do some addition and subtraction problems instead.) That said, his handwriting is starting to look pretty darn amazing, and is beginning to become a routine, so that he doesn't have to "reinvent the wheel" every time he starts to write a letter. I am very excited, furthermore, with the meaningful way the program gives children for delineating lower case d from lower case b, because it seems to be working for my son. Spalding encourages kids to feel the ways in which their mouths form the sounds of these letters. The tongue curves to make the sound of d, and when writing this letter the first thing we do is make a curved, open shape. Lower case b is a "line letter" however, because we begin it by making a line. We can remember this because the lips form a tight line when we make the b sound....
Just as the book's title says, the program teaches reading through writing; children learn to spell first, analyzing words to identify and mark the phonetic rules at work in each sample. The theory is (I think), that by the time children have learned to spell using this method--which is intentionally kinesthetic and multi-sensory in its approach--the phonograms will be so thoroughly ingrained in the child that reading will not require the constant and exhausting sounding-out that has been a problem for my son in the past. I can believe this based on our experience so far. While it is typically difficult for him to focus on work, he is faring better with this approach because it engages his body (through handwriting, conscious articulation....)as well as his mind. He is learning the sounds of multi-letter phonograms now, and writing the "letter teams," as we call them; I expect he'll start the spelling/analysis phase of the program in about a week.
I bought this fourth edition based on other parents' comments regarding the better instruction and the cuttable phonogram cards found in this version . I am happy with it, though I can't compare it to other editions. I will say that, as cheap as I am, having cut out the 70 enclosed cards using a paper cutter, laminated the cards, and re-cut them, I think I would be willing to buy the card set for $20, had I to do it all over again. Also, the vinyl record in the back of this version is cute in a retro sort of way, but my son and I both have appreciated the fact that official videos giving the pronunciation of the phonograms are available on Youtube. [...]
I've written a lot here, but consider it a sign of my appreciation for this program. It requires work, but for us, the work is proving to be well-spent.
  • Zut
A friend of mine gave me this book. She told me her mother (an elementary school teacher of over 30 years) told her this was by far the best program to teach children phonics. I was homeschooling my 2nd grade daughter at the time. We had been doing 4 work pages of phonics everyday for months. Her spelling was fair. After just two weeks of doing the flash cards in this book, her spelling increased 300%!
Later, my son and daughter did this complete program in a local charter school throughout their elementary years. They learned how to not only sound out long difficult words, but how to spell them. I really love this simple effective method and book.
  • Niwield
My four year old had not been interested in reading or his letters. I would say he is your average 4 year old boy in this regard. He picked up some stuff from preschool, but it wasn't really translating into his reading skills. He would come home "reading" little books from preschool, but as soon as you cover the picture, he'd be clueless. He literally was memorizing the whole book verbatim by the pics, and not looking at the words. My daughter learned to read by sight, and has weak comprehension, so I have been determined to not rush my son and to teach him via a phonics approach. I had tried another popular learn to read with phonics approach, and my son did not like like the structure and the sing song rhymes that went with this other approach. We have been using the Spalding approach with a salt tray for a few weeks now (instead of pencil and paper because his handwriting is not very developed yet). My son is remembering more of the sounds and is not resisting sitting down for the lessons, like he was with the other approach. I bought this book used, and the seller included some extras, which were very helpful, a cassette tape with someone (Mrs. Spalding?) saying each phonogram, phonogram cards, and a booklet with suggestions on implementing the method. The phonogram cards would be easy to create on your own on index cards, but the tape has been really helpful. Not only do I know that I am saying it correctly, my son seems to enjoy hearing someone else say the sounds. Plus, a cassette player is such a novelty to him that it makes his lesson kind of fun for him. He doesn't know that cassette players are antiquated! I highly recommend getting the cassette (or CD or whatever they sell now) and they booklet to go with this, if you can. The booklet (extra included in my order) is helpful, and we do several sounds a day, as suggested, which is good for him because I think otherwise he is a little bored by the limited scope of a lesson with only one sound. Another thing that has been good for my son with this method, is that it just focuses on what the letter says, and not the name of the letter. I think this is helpful for learning to read, because we don't see a word and then say each letter and then pronounce it. Also, I like the way this method starts with lowercase letters since this is what you encounter most often when reading.