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by Jan Currie,Richard Deangelis,Harry deBoer,Jeroen Huisman,Claude Lacotte

Download Globalizing Practices and University Responses: European and Anglo-American Differences eBook
ISBN:
0897898680
Author:
Jan Currie,Richard Deangelis,Harry deBoer,Jeroen Huisman,Claude Lacotte
Category:
Schools & Teaching
Language:
English
Publisher:
Praeger; 1st Edition edition (January 30, 2003)
Pages:
248 pages
EPUB book:
1652 kb
FB2 book:
1496 kb
DJVU:
1160 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
176


They found differences between European and American universities in their approach to permanent employment

They found differences between European and American universities in their approach to permanent employment. The French and Norwegian universities were maintaining many of their traditional values and only the Dutch university showed some movement towards the globalizing practices, which American universities were more readily adopting.

Investigates the impact that certain globalizing practices have on European and American universities. It is concerned with policy and practice in a global perspective

Investigates the impact that certain globalizing practices have on European and American universities. Due to dwindling resources and the ideology of privatization, universities are becoming more corporatized and managerial. It is concerned with policy and practice in a global perspective. Studies in Higher Education is dedicated to illuminating the reality of higher and postsecondary education in contemporary society. Higher education is a central enterprise of the twenty-first century and a key part of the knowledge-based economy.

Jan Currie, Harry de Boer, Richard deAngelis, Jeroen Huisman, Claude . BT - Globalizing Practices and University Responses: European and Anglo-American Differences.

Jan Currie, Harry de Boer, Richard deAngelis, Jeroen Huisman, Claude Lacotte. Currie J, de Boer H, deAngelis R, Huisman J, Lacotte C. Globalizing Practices and University Responses: European and Anglo-American Differences. Westport: Praeger, 2003. Currie, Jan ; de Boer, Harry ; deAngelis, Richard ; Huisman, Jeroen ; Lacotte, Claude.

Before examining the effect of globalizing practices on universities, it is necessary to understand globalization as a process.

The globalizing practices examined in this book began appearing, unevenly around the globe, 30 years ago in the field of higher education. Initially, these practices arose in the United States, then spread to Commonwealth countries such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, and further to European countries. Around the globe, these practices intensified in the last decade of the twentieth century. Before examining the effect of globalizing practices on universities, it is necessary to understand globalization as a process.

Start by marking Globalizing Practices and University Responses: European . Jan Currie, Richard Deangelis. Investigates the impact that certain globalizing practices have on European and American universities.

Start by marking Globalizing Practices and University Responses: European and Anglo-American Differences as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The European and American University since 1800. Universities are said to be the 'powerhouses' of modern society. They educate leaders, and advance our basic knowledge. International Differences in the Business Practices and Productivity of Firms Morality and Cultural Differences. Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights. P1: JzQ 052183354Xagg. xml Gould 0 521 83354 X June 7, 2004 13:50 This page intentionally left blank ii P1: JzQ.

Globalizing practices and university responses: European and Anglo-American differences. J Currie, R DeAngelis, H De Boer, J Huisman, C Lacotte. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2003. Institutional diversity in higher education: A crossnational and longitudinal analysis. J Huisman, L Meek, F Wood. Higher Education Quarterly 61 (4), 563-577, 2007. Jan Currie, Richard DeAngelis, Harry de Boer, Jeroen Huisman, Claude Lacotte.

Investigates the impact that certain globalizing practices have on European and American universities. Due to dwindling resources and the ideology of privatization, universities are becoming more corporatized and managerial. The authors investigate the consequences of these changes on the lives of academics and analyze how globalizing practices such as managerialism, accountability, and employment flexibility penetrate different universities.

Globalization is a contested term. It exists in the form of an integrated world economy and global communication networks. Along with this material world, politicians have created a neoliberal ideology that exhorts nation states to open up their economies to free trade, reduce their public sector, and allow market forces to reshape their public agencies. In effect, this means a reduced role for government, lower taxes, and diminishing funds for public institutions like universities. The underlying thesis of this book is that globalization is not an inexorable force. All nations need to debate its consequences. The authors analyze how globalizing practices are penetrating universities. Are they creating a certain uniformity? Are academics adapting to or resisting particular globalizing practices?

The premise at the beginning of the study was that European universities were responding differently to globalizing practices than Anglo-American universities. This premise was confirmed as some universities saw certain globalizing practices as inevitable and other universities resisted them. The authors asked academics and key managers how their funding had changed, and which accountability mechanisms their universities adopted. They also investigated the use of the Internet in their teaching. They found differences between European and American universities in their approach to permanent employment. The French and Norwegian universities were maintaining many of their traditional values and only the Dutch university showed some movement towards the globalizing practices, which American universities were more readily adopting.