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Download Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mi'Kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia eBook

by Isabelle Knockwood

Download Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mi'Kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia eBook
ISBN:
096941806X
Author:
Isabelle Knockwood
Category:
Schools & Teaching
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Green Pub Co; 2nd edition (December 1, 1992)
Pages:
159 pages
EPUB book:
1925 kb
FB2 book:
1259 kb
DJVU:
1203 kb
Other formats
mobi azw rtf lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
919


The true stories of Mi'Kmaw children forced to attend Indian Residential Schools in Nova Scotia are beyond heartbreaking.

The true stories of Mi'Kmaw children forced to attend Indian Residential Schools in Nova Scotia are beyond heartbreaking. One can't help but admire the straightforward storytelling of Isabelle Knockwood as she describes the sense of pride and courage buried deep within small children as they struggle to survive in a world filled with depravity and pain. Throw away the sugarcoated fairy tales and learn what really happened to innocent Mi'Kmaw infants, toddlers, and children and understand how abuse affects future generations

I remember hearing about how the last residential school was closed in 1996. I heard about it over the radio, and that was the first time I had heard about residential schools (I was a teenager).

Out Of The Depths: The Experiences Of Mi'kmaw Children At The Indian Residential School At Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. I remember hearing about how the last residential school was closed in 1996. I remember hearing Stephen McNeil's apology in 2008. This book is amazing and horrifying.

In the 1880s, through an amendment to the Indian Act of 1876, the government of Canada began to require all Aboriginal children to attend schools administered by churches. Daring to break the code of silence imposed on Aboriginal students, residential school survivor Isabelle Knockwood offers the firsthand experiences of forty-two survivors of the Shubenacadie Indian Residential School.

oceedings{Knockwood2001OutOT, title {Out of the Depths: The . Isabelle Knockwood, Gillian Thomas.

oceedings{Knockwood2001OutOT, title {Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mi'kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia}, author {Isabelle Knockwood and Gillian Thomas}, year {2001} }. Laura Burns, Joanne Whitty-Rogers, Cathy Macdonald.

The Shubenacadie Indian Residential School was part of the Canadian Indian residential school system and was located in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. It was the only one in Atlantic Canada and children from across the region were placed in the institution. The schools were funded through Indian Affairs and the Catholic Church. The institution was like an orphanage, which were the forerunners of contemporary child protection and welfare services

Find all books from Isabelle Knockwood. com you can find used, antique and new books, compare results and immediately purchase your selection at the best price.

Find all books from Isabelle Knockwood. Details of the book - Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mikmaw Children at the Indian Residential School in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. EAN (ISBN-13): 9780969418054 ISBN (ISBN-10): 0969418051 Paperback Publishing year: 1993 Publisher: Roseway Pub Co Ltd. Book in our database since 2009-03-20T05:01:34-04:00 (New York) Detail page last modified on 2018-04-17T18:21:26-04:00 (New York) ISBN/EAN: 0969418051.

In her book about the experience of the Mi’kmaq children at the residential school at Shubenacadie . How do you explain why Knockwood laughed when she saw her image in the mirror? What might she have been feeling? Previous Reading.

In her book about the experience of the Mi’kmaq children at the residential school at Shubenacadie, Isabelle Knockwood reports on this moment of transformation as she and her sister Rosie experienced it. Soon after watching their mother leave, she writes, Our home clothes were stripped off and we were put in the tub. When we got out we were given new clothes with wide black and white vertical stripes. Much later I discovered that this was almost identical to the prison garb of the time. We were also given numbers.

Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mi'kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia (Lockport: Roseway, 1992); Cariboo Tribal CouncilFaith Misplaced: The Lasting Effects of Abuse.

Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mi'kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia (Lockport: Roseway, 1992); Cariboo Tribal CouncilFaith Misplaced: The Lasting Effects of Abuse in a First Nations Community. Isabelle Knockwood (with Gillian Thomas), Out of the Depths: The Experiences of Mi'kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia (Lockport: Roseway, 1992); Cariboo Tribal Council, "Faith Misplaced: The Lasting Effects of Abuse in a First Nations Community," Canadian Journal of Native Education 18, 2 (1991); Basil Johnston, Indian School Days (Toronto: Key.

PEI School Library System. Library Catalog Title Author Subject ISBN Series Call Number. Out of the depths : the experiences of Mi'kmaw children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia /. Normal View MARC View ISBD View.

Book by Knockwood, Isabelle
  • playboy
This is one of those rare books that will stay with you for a very long time. The true stories of Mi'Kmaw children forced to attend Indian Residential Schools in Nova Scotia are beyond heartbreaking. One can't help but admire the straightforward storytelling of Isabelle Knockwood as she describes the sense of pride and courage buried deep within small children as they struggle to survive in a world filled with depravity and pain. Throw away the sugarcoated fairy tales and learn what really happened to innocent Mi'Kmaw infants, toddlers, and children and understand how abuse affects future generations. Thank you Ms. Knockwood for giving us the gift of a true history lesson. It's one I'll never forget.
  • Nothing personal
So much healing needs to take place within and without my Mi'kMaw Nation. Miss Knockwood's work helps to begin that healing because to heal from any hurt means that you first need to acknowledge it. So many of our families have turned to alcohol or other drugs to numb the pain or are living with debilitating post traumatic stress disorders, unable to form attachments because of the damage to kinship values within the walls of the residential schools. Congratulations to Canada who, as a country, is at least apologising for the devastation to babies, adults and communities who were shamed into thinking that to be an Indian meant being a savage without a soul. I din't think I'll live to see the US taking the same action, but chii miigwech (big thanks), Miss Knockwood!
  • Zut
A heartfelt account of the abuse at this school. Anyone who doubts the accounts,should read.
  • Qane
I purchased this book to do a research paper on the subject in College English, my grandmother was actually in the book. I have know about that since I was kid, however I haven't seen a copy of the book since then. I decided to purchase one. Great read, very detailed survivor accounts of the abuse and neglect suffered by the Native Children at one of The many Residential Schools.
  • Manarius
Got here super fast. Excellent reading.
  • Truthcliff
Revelations about pedophile priests have been fairly frequent in the news for the last several years, ...and probably will continue to be for quite some time.

This book gives us an entirely new twist on this repulsive scandal.

The author gives us a thoroughly candid picture into the vile, soul-crushing hell of Indian Boarding Schools. There are plenty of film-documentaries on the fate of Native Americans, and what became of them in the late 19th to mid 20th centuries. Most of them give merely passing reference to the harsh environment within the Indian schools, while focusing on the larger picture of the cultural disintegration of the tribes. These "schools" were a series of institutions in the United States and Canada, whose general aim was to "civilize" the children of the various surviving Indigenous People, ...by erasing their Native American heritage.

We generally know that conditions were bad for the children in these schools, ...but this narrative is particularly shocking, as it comes from the personal experience and observations of the author. It is particularly striking in that the events and conditions described within, took place within living-memory. The author and children like her are middle-aged or elderly adults now. The events of this book took place in the 1950s. The setting is a Catholic boarding-school in eastern Canada.

The priests and nuns of this facility presided over an institution where the children were frequently physically, sexually, and verbally abused. Its all described here in horrible detail.
-In the very least, the children were subjected to constant derision and humiliation by "care-takers" who hated their Native American wards.
-The children received a level of education that could be described as mediocre at best, but was in fact quite abyssmal.
-They were subjected to long hours of strenuous labor that was in fact illegal under the Child Labor Laws of Canada.
-All in all, the conditions in the school are reminiscent of descriptions of a Soviet gulag or a P.O.W. prison.

The after-math is much worse. Considering the inevitable damage that such a traumatic childhood brings, the Catholic church owes these people a debt that can never be repayed.
  • Centrizius
Books such as this, not the wimpy textbooks now used, need to be the heart of reading matter by students. A curriculum based on human relations & cross-cultural understanding is vital to our survival. Only by knowing the truth can we rebuild society.
Consider buying 25 different books along this line instead of the same 25 dull textbooks for your classes & you will have taken a major step toward independent thinking & genuine education & away from the schooljails now in existence everywhere, not just during Isabelle's time in Shubenacadie. What needs to be remembered is that the children in those horrid settings were often emotionally more damaged than they were physically, & this continues on the emotional level as long as children have no say in how, what, & who will educate them. Respect works only when it's mutual, a 2-way exchange. Thank you Isabelle for this touching account.