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Download 3D Game Engine Programming (Game Development Series) eBook

by Oliver Duvel,Stefan Zerbst

Download 3D Game Engine Programming (Game Development Series) eBook
ISBN:
1592003516
Author:
Oliver Duvel,Stefan Zerbst
Category:
Graphics & Design
Language:
English
Publisher:
Course Technology PTR; 1 edition (June 30, 2004)
Pages:
896 pages
EPUB book:
1631 kb
FB2 book:
1157 kb
DJVU:
1631 kb
Other formats
lrf mobi txt doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
476


Stefan Zerbst, Oliver Duvel. Developing your own 3D game engine can be a demanding task. This book takes you beyond simply building your game engine, showing you how you can apply it to implement a network deathmatch first-person shooter.

Stefan Zerbst, Oliver Duvel. If you?re up for the challenge, then "3D Game Engine Programming" is ready to take you through each step. All you need to begin is a working knowledge of C or C++and basic knowledge of the DirectX and Direct3D interfaces.

Stefan Zerbst holds a degree in Computer Science with Business Administration. The quest to become a master of 3D engines has brought me to another book, 3D Game Engine Programming by Stefan Zerbst (with a forward from the legendary Andre LaMothe)

Stefan Zerbst holds a degree in Computer Science with Business Administration. Starting programming on the ancient C16 he is now the author of two best selling German books about game programming and runs the German hobby game programming community Zf. nfo. The quest to become a master of 3D engines has brought me to another book, 3D Game Engine Programming by Stefan Zerbst (with a forward from the legendary Andre LaMothe).

3D Game Engine Programming (Game Development Series) (Stefan Zerbst, Oliver Duvel). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63. 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126.

Stefan Zerbst started programming on the ancient C16 and now holds a. .3D Engines and Game Programming. We would like to be treated as objects of human lust today and not as musicians

Stefan Zerbst started programming on the ancient C16 and now holds a German Diplom degree in Computer Science in Economics. During his studies he founded the German hobby game development community ZFX (ww. fx. info), which is the biggest and most active development community in Germany. We would like to be treated as objects of human lust today and not as musicians. Campino, lead singer of the band Toten Hosen, shortly before women-only concert.

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The Very Best Game Programming Books - Game Industry Career Guide . You can read by Oliver Duvel, Stefan Zerbst online 3D Game Engine Programming (Game Development Series) or downloading.

The Very Best Game Programming Books - Game Industry Career Guide - This book is the first in an excellent series that takes you from knowing nothing, games using the Unity 3D game engine. 6 Best 3D Game Programming Books For Game Developers FromDev - Top 3D Game Programming Books to develop highly interactive three 3D Game Engine Programming (Game Development Series).

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3D Game Engine Programming (Game Development Series). The high cost of game engines makes it difficult for new game programmers to use them

3D Game Engine Programming (Game Development Series). By: Stefan Zerbst & Oliver Duvel ) Unlike the earlier games, most of the modern games use 3D game engine for an efficient gaming environment. The high cost of game engines makes it difficult for new game programmers to use them. This book will guide you to write your complete game engine with all the comprehensive features such as rendering, math libraries, input, audio and network handling

Authors : Zerbst, Stefan, Duvel, Oliver. Condition : Used - Good No CD. We aim to provide a vast range of textbooks, rare and collectible books at a great price.

Authors : Zerbst, Stefan, Duvel, Oliver. Through our work with A-CET we have helped give hundreds of young people in Africa the vital chance to get an education. See all. About this item. Postage, Returns & Payments.

3D Game Engine Programming. By (author) Oliver Duvel, By (author) Stefan Zerbst. Game Development Series. The availability of a game engine which is ready to rock simplifies the development process of a game, allowing developers to concentrate on the game and gameplay experience. 3D Game Engine Programming" shows game programmers how to develop such an engine. Format Mixed media product 896 pages.

A full-blown game engine is now an important industrial asset. Current engines exist with licensing fees of several $100,000, plus profit share costs. Because of these high costs, hobbyist game programmers are eager to learn how to write their own engines. The availability of a game engine which is ready to rock simplifies the development process of a game, allowing developers to concentrate on the game and gameplay experience. "3D Game Engine Programming" shows game programmers how to develop such an engine.
  • Thetahuginn
The quest to become a master of 3D engines has brought me to another book, 3D Game Engine Programming by Stefan Zerbst (with a forward from the legendary Andre LaMothe). This is one of the first books I’ve read in a while that wasn’t available on the Kindle, and it’s out of print, but I managed to find a used copy of the paperback without a problem. At a somewhat meaty 850 pages, it was a little cumbersome to read, especially laying down in bed. It’s really amazing how spoiled you get with new technology. Anyway, the book was great and I enjoyed the whole thing.

Though I have been reading a bunch of books on graphics programming, this one was a refreshing peek into the design of a 3D engine. It was also obvious that the engine was a living, breathing thing. Not just a sample created for the book. Zerbst covers a lot of ground here: rendering with DirectX9, sound, input, scene management, networking, a math library, even creating a simple level editor/low-poly modeler. And he goes in-depth, even to the point of hand-coding assembly for optimizing a vector class. And, somehow, he made it make sense.

I very much enjoyed the amount of code and the amount of discussion that followed each piece. There are tons of code samples throughout the book, with ample explanation as to what everything is doing. Though there were a few cases of long, multi-page code samples, for the most part the author kept things as concise as possible.

Another thing I liked was how Stefan Zerbst broke out each major component of the engine into it’s own DLL (i.e. one for graphics, one for sound, one for input, etc.). I think this is a great idea, and has the potential to speed up development without having to compile all these parts of the engine every time you need to test your game. This is certainly something I want to explore further with my engine.

Surprisingly, the book was not totally outdated considering it was first published in 2004 (almost 10 years ago, OMG!). Granted, there is some discussion of stencil shadows and the fixed-function pipeline but, for the most part, the basic concepts are still valid today. It’s also somewhat amazing (or amusing) that Microsoft created an API (DirectX9) that still going strong so many years later.

However, the book isn’t totally without fault. One thing that seemed a little strange was the authors liberal use of global variables for key parts of the engine. He would even say: “I am just using a global here to make things simple as an example, you may not want to do this in your engine” or something to that effect. I understand making things easy for illustration, but why not show us the right way to do it?

It’s not like one single book could ever cover all you need to know about writing 3D engines, certainly not in 850 pages. That being said, 3D Game Engine Programming is an awesome resource for the aspiring engine creator. It covers territory not seem in other books and really digs deep into the aspects that matter. All-in-all I found this text to be helpful and am glad to have it in my growing collection.
  • Galubel
It is quite obvious the guy below me does not indeed own the book yet, as he has stated. I have to agree more with the first review. I am sure the author knows a great deal about this subject, and the design of the engine proves that. However, he fails to explain the book very well. In lectures you can ask questions and understand the subject matter fully, but in a book you can not.

The advantages to this book:

1) The book designs and implements a reusable, API independant game engine.

2) It gives you great ideas on how to implement your own engine, which will probably really be more of a modification to the engine in this book.

3) The source code is clean and seems to compile

Disadvantages:

1) The book doesn't actually teach you anything about designing an engine. It really is just a bunch of code thrown at you. You have no clue what direction the author is going next. By studying the code and reading the book you should be able to see his reasoning behind the code easily.

2) The author does not present all the neccessary code in the book. In the third chapter, the author uses an enumeration class that he never defines, along with a bunch of structs that are defined in the code on the cd, but not in the book. The author actually skips over the part about getting the device enumerations because he doesn't want to bore you.

3) The author uses features that are just pointless in developing a game engine. For instance, he creates a dialog box with a bunch of settings for the users to set every single time the application will run. Most of the users don't care about the settings, or for that matter, even know what they are. Instead he should find a default setting and allow the programmer to change the settings.

I am currently developing a game engine and I think the organization of the engine in this book will be really useful. The engine is organized in a way that makes it extremely flexible. It uses dll files and interfaces so you can update the engine without changing any of the code in the main application. For design of the engine, I would give the book 5 stars. For the implementation, only 2. I can't stand it when authors 'forget' to include some of the code that is needed.