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Download Java 2: The Complete Reference, Third Edition eBook

by Patrick Naughton,Herb Schildt,Herbert Schildt

Download Java 2: The Complete Reference, Third Edition eBook
ISBN:
0072119764
Author:
Patrick Naughton,Herb Schildt,Herbert Schildt
Category:
Programming Languages
Language:
English
Publisher:
Osborne Publishing; 3rd edition (March 29, 1999)
Pages:
1108 pages
EPUB book:
1423 kb
FB2 book:
1314 kb
DJVU:
1487 kb
Other formats
rtf mobi lit lrf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
165


However, the tutorial in this book is more condensed than in the guide, which has over 500 pages

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In this completely up-to-date volume, Herb Schildt, the world's leading programming author .

In this completely up-to-date volume, Herb Schildt, the world's leading programming author, shows you everything you need to know to develop, compile, debug, and run Java applications and applets.

Java 2: The complete reference.

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Reference: 1. Programming with java, by E Balaguruswamy. 2. Computing Concepts with Java 2 Essentials, by Horstmann, John Wiley.

Herbert Schildt’s most popular book is Java: The Complete Reference. Showing 30 distinct works

Herbert Schildt’s most popular book is Java: The Complete Reference. Showing 30 distinct works. Java: The Complete Reference by. Herbert Schildt.

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Take JAVA to the max with expert help Beginning, intermediate, and advanced JAVA programmers alike take note: everything you need to get the best performance out of your applets and servlets is packed into JAVA 2.0: The Complete Reference. World- renowned authors, Patrick Naughton (ESPN's Sportszone, Disney, and ABC News Web sites), Herb Schildt, the world's leading programming author, and Joseph OAENeil add 30% more material to their hugely successful past editions of this best seller. They show you exactly how to develop, compile, debug, and run Java applications and applets quickly and confidently. Plus you'll become expert on all of Java's new features including: *Servlets used to build powerful, scalable, robust Web applications *The Swing component set, a GUI toolkit that simplifies the development of visual components such as menus, tool bars, dialogs *Utility class updates *Java2-D, which enables you to build advanced 2D graphics and images
  • Shalizel
The sections I've read of the book so far are well written and easy to follow, and typically have good examples.
But there were a couple areas I was dissapointed in: 1: The authors should have given a bit more advice on which classes are now preferred, which classes programmers really use, etc. Examples: In the Collections Framework section, I would have appreciated more advice about how to decide which is the best collection class to use, some guidelines or something; Java 2 has LOTS of collection implementations to choose from. The same is true for the java.io section; which file/io routines to programmers really use. How important is buffered IO in the real world? Is it worth the extra steps to code, etc. 2: The examples were generally good, though there are some changes. First of all, examples were repeated frequently with a few lines changed. It would be nice to see those specific new lines highlighted in some way. Also, in some cases, I would have liked an additional, new example vs. just repeating and modifying the previous example. But the examples weren't bad, certainly on a par with other books. I still would recommend the book, but not as a sole reference or tutorial.
  • Bukus
I found this book very useful for learning Java (I am using it while I also read "Thinking in Java"). I am a beginning programmer, knowing a little html and vbscript so I don't have a background of C++ or C under my belt. This book takes you step by step and explains concepts that you build on to understand object oriented programming, classes, methods and so on. If you know C++, you won't have a problem at all. The examples are perfect if you are patient enough to type them in. I didn't find the downloadable .lst code very helpful, but the examples are correct in this book.
  • fire dancer
"Complete Reference" is definitely a perfect name for this book. It is complete and I find myself using this book often. It is also well written and easy to follow.
  • asAS
This book was excellent. I received it as expected and in good condition
  • Fordrelis
When I needed to learn the Java programming language very quickly for work, I read many reviews and narrowed down my search to handful of few books. I looked at copies of my final possible choices in a local bookstore and finally purchased Herbert Schildt's "Java 2: A Beginner's Guide, Second Edition" and have absolutely no regrets. Along with this book, I realized that I would also need a more comprehensive reference book detailing the multitude of Java classes designed for many purposes. To this end, I chose Herbert Schildt's "Java 2: The Complete Reference, Fifth Edition" not only for its extensive library, but also because of Herbert Schildt's wonderful writing that is easy to read and understand quickly.
Herbert Schildt subdivided "Java 2: The Complete Reference, Fifth Edition" into four parts: tutorial, library, software development and applications. Part I (the first 346 pages) is a Java tutorial, organized similarly to Herbert Schildt's other book that I purchased, "Java 2: A Beginner's Guide, Second Edition". However, the tutorial in this book is more condensed than in the guide, which has over 500 pages. Some readers may find the condensed approach in this book sufficient to learn the language, but if you want more comprehensive tutorial explanations, the guide is good companion.
Part II (the next 539 pages) is an extensive library detailing most of Java's built-in classes dealing with everything from string handling, collections, utility classes, console I/O, file I/O, networking, applets, event handling (mouse movements, button use, and other interactive GUI objects), the AWT (Abstract Window Toolkit), images and other I/O types including Regular Expressions. Part III (the next 128 pages) provides some information about Java Beans, Swing, Servlets and a helpful guide for migrating from C++ to Java. Part IV (the next 123 pages) shows Java in action with four example applications.
Overall, I rate Herbert Schildt's "Java 2: The Complete Reference, Fifth Edition" with 5 out of 5 stars. It has become a constant companion as I learn and work with Java.
  • Priotian
I have always enjoyed Osborne's "Complete Reference" series, and this book is no exception. Designed as both a learning aid and a reference book, I found that material was both easy to lookup and the text was engaging enough to read through.
The book starts out with an overview of Java, including a discussion of OOP. If you're an experienced OO Programmer, you'll probably be a bit bored. Really the first 6 chapters cover all the basics of creating a Java program (including data types, operators, classes, and control statements). After this initial discussion, the book gets a bit more complicated by diving into inheritance, threads, and I/O.
What I really enjoyed about this book is the rest of it: after this discussion on Java language principles, the rest of the book is a how-to on the various Java libraries. For example, in the chapter on the java.util library, there is a section on the HashSet class. There is a description of the class (including various overloaded constructors) and a good example of how to use it. Think O'Reilly's Java In A Nutshell but with a lot more instruction and examples.
Another thing I really enjoyed about the reference section of this book, is that "gotchas" are clearly outlined. Where there are tricky little things you wouldn't think about, or differences in how Java behaves depending on what your might expect, this book explains these issues. In any case, the reference section covers the java.lang, java.util, java.io libraries in addition to providing detailed discussion of using networking and AWT libraries.