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Download The Race: The Complete True Story of How America Beat Russia to the Moon eBook

by James Schefter

Download The Race: The Complete True Story of How America Beat Russia to the Moon eBook
ISBN:
0385492545
Author:
James Schefter
Category:
Engineering
Language:
English
Publisher:
Anchor; Reprint edition (July 5, 2000)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1262 kb
FB2 book:
1751 kb
DJVU:
1392 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
106


Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iO. In 1963, a young reporter for Time-Life named James Schefter was given a dream job: cover America's race to the moon

Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Race: The Complete True Story of How America Beat Russia to the Moon" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. In 1963, a young reporter for Time-Life named James Schefter was given a dream job: cover America's race to the moon.

The Race is a deeply-flawed, error-filled book that adds nothing to our understanding of the space race. Schefter was a journalist with both Time and Life magazines during the 1960s. As such, he got to hang around with some of the astronauts and other NASA officials. One story is that sometimes 3 or 4 women would line up in the hallway outside an astronaut's hotel room, waiting for their "turn" with him. This stud service tale and many others have the air of stories told around a poker table over too many beers-about as believable as the story about the fish that got away.

In 1963, a young reporter for Time-Life named James Schefter was given a dream job: cover America's race to the moon.

Indispensable to anyone interested in the space race. But at the time, his primary role was to excite "Indispensable to anyone interested in the space race.

James Schefter covered NASA from 1963 to 1973, for the Houston Chronicle until 1965, and then for Time-Life. By then, of course, the race was long over. His work has appeared in magazines as diverse as Popular Science, Reader’s Digest, and Paris Match. Schefter is the author of All Corvettes Are Red: The Rebirth of an American Legend. I aided and abetted in successful conspiracies to smuggle items to the moon; I loaned my plane to astronauts and walked with them through the jungles of Panama, the volcanic interior of Iceland, and the stark terrain of the California Mojave.

In 1963, a young reporter named Jim Schefter was given a dream job: cover America's race to the moon. Of course, for PR reasons he could not write a fraction of what he saw then. The messy and glorious saga of the golden years of the American space program, told in d detail by a man who was there. In 1963, a young reporter named Jim Schefter was given a dream job: cover America's race to the moon.

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The Race: The Complete True Story of How America Beat Russia to the Moon (Paperback). James Schefter (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Author: James Schefter. The Story of Russia The True Story of the Bilderberg Group. The Story of Russia  . The True Story of the Bilderberg Group.

"Indispensable to anyone interested in the space race."--Houston ChronicleIn 1963, a young reporter for Time-Life named James Schefter was given a dream job: cover America's race to the moon.  Since the astronauts were under contract to Life for their stories, Schefter was given complete access to the biggest players at NASA.  But at the time, his primary role was to excite the public about the new, expensive, experimental space program, and he couldn't write about everything he saw.  In The Race, he does.From drunken astronaut escapades to near disasters to ferocious political battles, the race to the moon was anything but the smooth process it appeared.  There were vicious fights between the engineers, feuds and practical jokes, near-fatal accidents, and dozens of brave, smart, and colorful characters pulling off the greatest exploration in the history of humankind. Like Undaunted Courage and D-Day, this is a tale of achieving the extraordinary against extraordinary odds.  As incredible as the "official" story of the space program is, the true, behind-the-scenes tale is more thrilling, more entertaining, and ultimately more ennobling.
  • Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
As a once-over lightly guide to the Mercury / Gemini / Apollo programme and its Russian counterparts, this isn't a bad book. But there are better ones available. Chaiken's "A Man on the Moon" is more interesting. Heppenheimer's "Countdown" seems more thorough. And James Harford's "Korolev" covers the Soviet effort in far greater depth.
Finding a way to make "The Race" stand out from the competition in an increasingly crowded publishing niche must have been tough. As a journalist in the thick of it as it happened, Schefter chose the "uncensored" route. "Uncensored", of course, is a meaningless adjective in this respect. As far as I know, there is no Censor of Books About Space. In its tabloid sense, however, a tag of uncensored makes us expect scandal and revelation. Sure enough, Schefter offers a little of both. But it's largely irrelevant. We knew 6/7ths of the Mercury astronauts were less than faithful - that is, we did if we read Wolfe's "Right Stuff" or ever personally knew a military pilot. And to read about some astronaut or other leaving his (to be famous) footprints on the roof lining of someone's car really adds very little to the narrative.
If Schefter was looking for an angle, why not his own? I would love to know what it was really like to be involved in reporting the space programme in the 1960s. Did he get caught up in the excitement of it all? Did he cry when Apollo 1 burned? The book sledom ventures into first person, which is a shame, because when it does it becomes novel and interesting. A little more humanity, a little more involvement, and this could have gone from being an OK book to one worth keeping.
  • Arlelond
Reading other reviews, I don't agree with some of the negative opinions that it was error prone & a once-over. There was quite a bit of detail in this book and I very much enjoyed it. I haven't read other books on the subject so I don't have anything to compare it to other than HBO's From the Earth to the Moon & Discovery's When We Left Earth. There was much more detail in this than in those (obviously). You can't go wrong with this one. It did seem the Mercury & Gemini portions of the book were well covered while the Apollo program had a bit less content. Not that it was rushed, but I thought I'd get a bit more (surprised it didn't get to Apollo 1 until about ~80% of the way through the book).
  • Gogal
On the back cover of this book is a photograph of the author, James Schefter. Arms crossed over his chest, wearing dark sunglasses, he stares at the photographer in what is apparently intended to be a macho pose. He is wearing a dark polo shirt with the NASA "Meatball" emblem patch over the left breast. This is rather odd. James Schefter is a journalist. Why is he dressed like a tough-guy astronaut? What is even stranger is that below the NASA patch is embroidered the name of this book, "The Race." What kind of author goes out and has the name of his book embroidered on a shirt, especially before that book has been printed?
The Race is a deeply-flawed, error-filled book that adds nothing to our understanding of the space race. Schefter was a journalist with both Time and Life magazines during the 1960s. As such, he got to hang around with some of the astronauts and other NASA officials. He bills this book as the "uncensored" account of that epic undertaking. But by this mostly what he means is that it includes some stories of astronauts getting drunk and cheating on their wives. Many of these more ribald tales are not totally believable. Some of them don't seem physically possible. One story is that sometimes 3 or 4 women would line up in the hallway outside an astronaut's hotel room, waiting for their "turn" with him. This stud service tale and many others have the air of stories told around a poker table over too many beers--about as believable as the story about the fish that got away. While the astronauts were not saints, as Tom Wolfe proved two decades ago (in what remains the best astronaut book ever written), Schefter's stories don't ring true.
Schefter exhibits many of the flaws of a journalist trying to write history. In short, he does not let facts get in the way of a good story. The book is riddled with numerous errors, many of which are relatively minor, but all of which indicate that Schefter is a sloppy and lazy writer.
For instance, the Vanguard satellite did not have "primitive photo-cells" that took an image of the earth. The Saturn I did not have a single F-1 engine and the F-1 engine produced 1.5, not 1.3 million pounds of thrust. "Escape velocity" is not 17,500 miles per hour. And the X-15 rocket plane was not dropped from the belly of a B-29; it was dropped from the wing of a B-52. He was obviously thinking of the movie The Right Stuff and its depiction of the X-1. You have to wonder about an author who seems to take his cues from movie versions of events.
One of his bigger errors concerns his account of the July 1969 explosion of the Soviet N-1 moon rocket. Schefter says that American spy satellites photographed the rocket on the pad just before the launch. Not true. More importantly, he says that when it exploded, it killed 100 people. Also not true. Nobody died. He is obviously confusing the explosion with the 1960 explosion of a Soviet ballistic missile that killed well over 100 people.
All of these things are totally checkable. The fact that Schefter did not bother to check them indicates an extreme laziness and journalistic arrogance on his part. The lack of footnotes, bibliography, or other sources indicates that we simply have to take Schefter's word for all this stuff. That is hard to do considering all the obvious mistakes.
If we cannot trust him on the things that we can check, how are we to trust him about the things that we cannot check? He has all kinds of rude astronaut stories which apparently came from the Houston NASA public affairs officer, Paul Haney (although Schefter does not make clear what are first-hand accounts and what are hearsay). As I already noted, many of these do not seem believable. Others are deeply problematic.
A good example is Schefter's account of an incident following the death of astronaut Ted Freeman in 1964. Schefter was a young reporter who heard about the crash of Freeman's plane and was told by his editor to meet chief astronaut Deke Slayton at the home of Freeman's wife. He went over there and saw what he thought was Slayton's Corvette parked in the driveway. He went to the door and knocked. Freeman's wife answered and Schefter stammered out that he had heard about the accident. An angry neighbor then told Schefter to get lost.
Schefter claims that it turns out that the Corvette actually belonged to the astronauts' doctor and that Deke Slayton was not there because he had stopped at a local bar first before facing the widow. The whole story smells. For one thing, the astronauts' doctor did not own a Corvette. And Schefter's claim that Slayton went to have a beer before meeting the widow of one of his men, whether true or not (and how are we to know?), seems like a slap at Slayton.
In Schefter's favor, it seems likely that Freeman's widow already knew that something was wrong when the doctor and neighbor showed up at her door. It is unlikely that Schefter is the one who blurted out the fact that her husband was dead. But the very fact that a reporter showed up to see the widow only an hour after the death of her husband is disgusting. Why should we have any sympathy for this vulture?
The subtitle of this book also says that it is the "complete" account of the race to the moon. It isn't by a long shot. There is very little information on the Soviet side of that race. The Russians barely exist in his narrative. Is the subtitle merely another factual error or an "embellishment?"
This is a pathetic attempt at a gossipy memoir by a guy who has trouble getting his facts right. Avoid it.
  • Fordrellador
A reporter's perspective on the race to the Moon. Lots of facts and interesting "stories." Doesn't cover everything, but does convey the suspense and the many ups and downs (mainly from the U.S. side).
  • Samugor
Excellent read for all. Just enough technical info for those who like to ask how and why but not overwhelming.