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Download On The Mesa eBook

by John Nichols

Download On The Mesa eBook
ISBN:
0941270874
Author:
John Nichols
Category:
Engineering
Language:
English
Publisher:
Gibbs Smith; 1st Ancient City Press ed edition (September 1, 2005)
Pages:
193 pages
EPUB book:
1368 kb
FB2 book:
1821 kb
DJVU:
1415 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
777


John Treadwell Nichols (born July 23, 1940, Berkeley, California) is an American novelist.

John Treadwell Nichols (born July 23, 1940, Berkeley, California) is an American novelist. Nichols is the author of the "New Mexico trilogy", a series about the complex relationship among history, race and ethnicity, and land and water rights in the fictional town of Chamisaville, New Mexico. The trilogy consists of The Milagro Beanfield War (which was adapted into a movie of the same title directed by Robert Redford), The Magic Journey, and The Nirvana Blues.

John Treadwell Nichols is an American novelist. On Top Of Spoon Mountain. A Fragile Beauty: John Nichols" Milagro Country. University of New Mexico Press. Keep lieutenant Simple: A Defense of the Earth.

Along the way (the book takes place over about a week long period) he has affairs with three different women, each with their own bizarre issues and agendas, and, at the same time, has to deal with his difficult family. And that's where it all gets really strange. In fact, one of the major characters of the book is a demonic monkey named Sasha, owned by one of Joe's lovers.

On the Mesa is an autobiographical celebration of life in a fragile and. John Nichols is the author of the New Mexico trilogy, a series about the complex relationship between history, race and ethnicity, and land and water rights in the fictional Chamisaville County, New Mexico. The trilogy consists of The Milagro Beanfield War (which was adapted into the film The Milagro Beanfield War directed by Robert Redford), The Magic Journey, and The Nirvana Blues.

For the first time in paperback with a new foreword by the author, On the Mesa is an autobiographical celebration of life in a fragile and marginal place

For the first time in paperback with a new foreword by the author, On the Mesa is an autobiographical celebration of life in a fragile and marginal place. On the deserted sagebrush plain just west of his home in Taos, New Mexico, John Nichols finds a healing serenity and an astonishing variety of life and mood that casual observers rarely notice. With On the Mesa, Nichols takes his place with the great nature writers of the West.

Books by John Nichols. When I sat down to begin The Milagro Beanfield War in 1972, I had no idea the story would grow into a trio of books. But I soon realized I had more to say about the vision of life essayed in Milagro, and so I wrote The Magic Journey. It was a different, and very difficult, book for me: I had an ambitious, even grandiose plan at the start, but wound up, as I usually do, desperately trying to salvage a novel.

John Nichols (. ? Your guess is as good as mine.

Published by Peregrine Smith Book,, Salt Lake:, 1986. If you have a question about one of our books feel free to call us at (860) 526-3896 between 8:30 AM and 9:30 PM EST any day of the week

Published by Peregrine Smith Book,, Salt Lake:, 1986. If you have a question about one of our books feel free to call us at (860) 526-3896 between 8:30 AM and 9:30 PM EST any day of the week. We also have a secure server attached to our web site should you need to employ that service to send us any confidential data.

Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Joe Mondragon, a feisty hustler with a talent for trouble, slammed his battered pickup to a stop, tugged on his gumboots, and marched into the arid patch of ground. Carefully (and also illegally), he tapped into the main irrigation channel. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

John Nichols - A Writer's Life . Many of his photographs appear in his book On the Mesa, among others.

John Nichols - A Writer's Life 1. Transcription. Nichols also has written non-fiction, including the trilogy If Mountains Die, The Last Beautiful Days of Autumn and On the Mesa. Nichols has lived in Taos, New Mexico for many years Nichols also is a photographer.

For the first time in paperback with a new foreword by the author, On the Mesa is an autobiographical celebration of life in a fragile and marginal place. On the deserted sagebrush plain just west of his home in Taos, New Mexico, John Nichols finds a healing serenity and an astonishing variety of life and mood that casual observers rarely notice. With On the Mesa, Nichols takes his place with the great nature writers of the West.
  • Alsantrius
Why not to live in New Mexico. Provides metaphors on life and what went horribly wrong in New Mexico
  • Stonewing
Great part of New Mexico trilogy
  • Aedem
This is the first book I have read by John Nichols and it will not be my last. The author writes with a clarity and concise description that puts the reader right in his shoes, through his eyes. Nichols' passion and love for things in nature, in particular Northern New Mexico's mesa shine through every pen stroke.

One of my favorite quotes from the book:

" A toad might trip on a rock, but never Gutzon Borglum. No matter, though: if it were bigger, somebody else might notice and show up one day with a wheelbarrow. It's things in nature which don't call attention to themselves that lead a long and happy life."- John Nichols

Much of this book is the author's detailed, seemingly immaculate descriptions of Northern New Mexico and also his experiences in dealing with land surveyor's and how important decisions also give more sway to the "progressive citizens" that live in the cities, rather than preserving the country side. Every year, more and more people move into once desolate areas such as Taos, and tourism economies such as ski resorts encourage the land to further be weathered and trampled on by humans. The author has a first-hand perspective, having lived in the mesa area for over two decades.

I just grabbed this book off the library shelf at random and I highly recommend reading it.
  • Bedy
Nichols' primary objective in this short work of non-fiction is to describe (in intricate detail) a year in the life of a stock pond. He begins with its birth from a flash flood, and then chronicles the happenings throughout the year, including all the small species that live off the fleeting resource. The book is bursting with paeans to rodents, snakes, flies, lichens, manifold species of birds, coyotes, beetles, giant salamanders, etc, etc. Any lover of nature writing will revel in Nichols' skill in bringing this world to life; he executes Thoreau's injunction, and skillfully backs life into a corner and learns what it has to teach. Nichols' relationship with his environment is deep, and the work benefits from his long hours spent in quiet observation of it.

The books is also a memoir describing a blossoming relationship with a woman and fellow-nature lover who also frequents the mesa, as well as the author's dealings with a local group of citizens fighting to save the mesa from encroachment. It is in these personal passages that we get the linear narrative, which helps bind together the nature passages.

The book succeeds as description of mesa nature, as poetry of the southwest, as memoir of a writer/naturalist, as a chronicle of the loss of nature to development's unthinking rapacity. The chapters are short, on average 3-5 pages, and interspersed with photographs from the author. After reading On the Mesa, I was inspired to get outside (in the middle of winter) and touch noses with the non-human world.
  • Akisame
Readers familiar with Nichol's other works might be surprised by On The Mesa. The book differs from anything he's published in the past and more nearly resembles the reflections of writers better known for non-fiction works than for fiction.
On The Mesa is the story of one of the skirmishes in the long war over the encroachments of 'post-modern' civilization into Northern New Mexico. Those battles are usually portrayed best in fiction works because they constitute an epic. Bradford's books, Red Sky at Morning and So Far From Heaven are two of the first of this genre, followed by the several Milagro Beanfield novels by Nichols.
On The Mesa lacks the penetrating humor readers find attractive in the fiction books by Nichols, but they'll probably be pleased by the reverence, the maturity of tone and the underlying sweet melancholy recognition of an inevitable loss in a noble fight to preserve a facet of the past.
  • Urtte
I just finished On the Mesa and found it one of the most gorgeous books I have ever read. I must also say that I know the area well. My parents and grandparents were all born and raised in New Mexico and I live in Taos whenever I can (I have a home there but find I have to make a living elsewhere). So was homesick when I picked this book up and found myself transported immediately. Nichol's writing is precise and poetic but also visceral. I could smell the scents, I could feel the temperature, see the stars, feel the breeze...I didn't have to miss the place, because in the reading of this book I was there.

So grateful. AND I learned so much about the natural world not only the experience but the names of things I have been familiar with forever but haven't really known.