almediah.fr
» » The Self-Induced Oscillations of Rotors

Download The Self-Induced Oscillations of Rotors eBook

by Mikhail Y. Kushul

Download The Self-Induced Oscillations of Rotors eBook
ISBN:
0306106930
Author:
Mikhail Y. Kushul
Category:
Engineering
Language:
English
Publisher:
Springer; 1964 edition (December 31, 1995)
Pages:
124 pages
EPUB book:
1119 kb
FB2 book:
1467 kb
DJVU:
1390 kb
Other formats
mobi rtf txt doc
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
632


The Self-Induced Oscillations of Rotors. Customers within the . and Canada please contact Customer Service at +1-800-777-4643, Latin America please contact us at +1-212-460-1500 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

The Self-Induced Oscillations of Rotors. price for USA in USD (gross). Due: January 14, 1997. ISBN 978-1-4684-9077-0.

Mikhail IAkovlevich Kushul'. Are you sure you want to remove The self-induced oscillations of rotors. There's no description for this book yet. The self-induced oscillations of rotors. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. from your list? The self-induced oscillations of rotors. by Mikhail IAkovlevich Kushul'.

Mikhail Yakovlevich Kushul. Oscillation and a class of linear delay differential equations.

The Self-Induced Oscillations of Rotors, Avtokolebaniya Rotorov, ? ? January 1995. Mikhail Yakovlevich Kushul. January 1977 · Transactions of the American Mathematical Society. David Lowell Lovelady.

The importance of flow excited acoustic resonance lies in the large number of applications in which it occurs. Sound production in organ pipes, compressors, transonic wind tunnels, and open sunroofs are only a few examples of the many applications in which flow excited resonance of Helmholtz resonators can be found. An instability of the fluid motion coupled with an acoustic resonance of the cavity produce large pressure fluctuations that are felt as increased sound pressure levels

Oscillation is the repetitive variation, typically in time, of some measure about a central value (often a point of equilibrium) or between two or more different states. The term vibration is precisely used to describe mechanical oscillation.

Oscillation is the repetitive variation, typically in time, of some measure about a central value (often a point of equilibrium) or between two or more different states. Familiar examples of oscillation include a swinging pendulum and alternating current.

Mochilas artesanales. Bordadas por mujeres Tzotziles de Zincantán, Chiapas.

the Self is the third and possibly final volume of Michel Foucault's widely acclaimed examination of "the experience .

the Self is the third and possibly final volume of Michel Foucault's widely acclaimed examination of "the experience of sexuality in Western society. Foucault takes us into the first two centuries of our own era, into the Golden Age of Rome, to reveal a subtle but decisive break from the classical Greek vision of sexual pleasure.

Self-sustained oscillations of shear flow past a slotted plate coupled with cavity resonance. Consideration has also been given to the occurrence of the self-induced oscillations in flumes of different scale and form. Export citation Request permission. Journal of Fluids and Structures, Vol. 17, Issue.

Resonance versus self-oscillation A. Forced resonance B. Work on oscillator C. Flow-induced instabilities D. Passive . Passive versus active devices E. Violin versus æolian harp F. Pipe organs G. Parametric resonance. IV. Feedback systems A. Clocks B. Relaxation oscillations. A. What and why. Self-oscillation is the generation and maintenance of a periodic motion by a source of power that lacks a corre-sponding periodicity: the oscillation itself controls the phase with which the power source acts on it.

The rapid increase in operating speeds of mechanisms and machines during the last few decades has posed mechanical and technical engineers aseries of new problems. One of these is that of the investigation of the dynamics of flexible rotors operating at speeds greater than the first- and higher-order critical speeds. In con­ temporary machine design we must cope with various machines and assemblies containing shafts which operate under such conditions: turbogenerators. gas and steam turbines. spinning shafts. high-capacity pumps, and a multitude of special-purpose machines. One of the problems in the dynamics of flexible rotors-the passage through the resonance state-has re­ cently been almost completely solved in the work of Yu. A. Mitropol'skii. F. M. Dirnentberg, V. O. Kononenko. A. P. Fillippov. and others. Much less attention has been devoted to two other interrelated problems in the dynamics of high-speed rotors: the loss of stability in regime-combining forced vibrations due to imbalance in the supercritical region, along with self-induced or self-exc1ted vibrations. These problems are rapidly becoming more important as self-induced vibrations occurring at speeds beyond the critical speed are being met with more and more often in practice [1-3]. One of the main causes for the loss of stability of a rotor in the supercritical region. as was first estab­ lished by Kimball in [4] and Newkirk in [5] during the ninteen-twenties, is the force due to interna1 friction.