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Download Too Far From Home: A Story of Life and Death in Space eBook

by Chris Jones

Download Too Far From Home: A Story of Life and Death in Space eBook
ISBN:
0385514654
Author:
Chris Jones
Category:
Engineering
Language:
English
Publisher:
Doubleday; 1 edition (March 6, 2007)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1112 kb
FB2 book:
1800 kb
DJVU:
1314 kb
Other formats
lrf doc mbr mobi
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
501


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Too Far From Home: A Stor. The author goes back to the history of the space race with Russia; with the first Russian in space; to animals sent in rockets to space; Neil Armstrong's walk on the moon; the Russian space station; and finally to the International Space Station. You will learn a lot of things about life in space that you probably did not know about, assuming you have not read such material before like me. For example, many early astronauts aboard space stations felt lonely and depressed and longed for home. All the earlier astronauts retired from NASA soon after their return from space!

Электронная книга "Too Far From Home: A Story of Life and Death in Space", Chris Jones.

Электронная книга "Too Far From Home: A Story of Life and Death in Space", Chris Jones. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Too Far From Home: A Story of Life and Death in Space" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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Chris Jones recreates the experience of two Americans and a Russian who were stranded in the International Space Station . While the world grieved for the Columbia crew lost on Feb. 1, 2003, three lonely men in space had a somewhat more complicated reaction

Chris Jones recreates the experience of two Americans and a Russian who were stranded in the International Space Station after the Columbia disaster. 1, 2003, three lonely men in space had a somewhat more complicated reaction. They had been there since the previous November, and they were getting ready to come home. But the disaster suspended space travel, so no new crew would arrive to relieve them in the foreseeable future. Suddenly they were stuck in a sci-fi limbo.

Too Far From Home book. While "Too Far From Home" retraces some aspects of our history in space, this historic story (whose details were new to me) in many ways starts upon the demise of space shuttle Columbia. On February 1, 2003, ten astronauts were orbiting the planet  .

Too Far From Home: A Story of Life and Death in Space. Too Far From Home chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth

Too Far From Home: A Story of Life and Death in Space. Written by Chris Jones. Narrated by Erik Davies. An incredible true-life adventure set on the most dangerous frontier of all-outer space. Too Far From Home chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth. Chris Jones writes beautifully of the majesty and mystique of space travel, while reminding us all how perilous it is to soar beyond the sky. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

TOO FAR FROM HOME chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth

TOO FAR FROM HOME chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth. The book was good, enjoyed it. The narrator did a great job. Donec in tortor in lectus iaculis vulputate. Nunc hendrerit tortor vitae est placerat ut varius erat posuere.

In the 37 years since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, space travel has seemed more and more a routine enterprise-at least until the shuttle Columbia blew up, and the Challenger before it. Now, this true-life adventure vividly captures the dangerous realities of space travel. Doubleday Religious Publishing Group, .

Chris Jones chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Control in Houston and Moscow as they work .

Chris Jones chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Control in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth, ultimately settling on a plan that felt, at best, like a long shot. Yet even amid the danger, the call of space is a siren song, and "Too Far From Home" details beautifully the majesty and mystique of space travel, while reminding us all how perilous it is to soar beyond the sky. Download from free file storage.

A Story of Life and Death in Space. TOO FAR FROM HOME chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth

A Story of Life and Death in Space. A Story of Life and Death in Space. By Chris Jones Read by Erik Davies. About Too Far From Home.

An incredible, true-life adventure set on the most dangerous frontier of all—outer spaceIn the nearly forty years since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, space travel has come to be seen as a routine enterprise—at least until the shuttle Columbia disintegrated like the Challenger before it, reminding us, once again, that the dangers are all too real.Too Far from Home vividly captures the hazardous realities of space travel. Every time an astronaut makes the trip into space, he faces the possibility of death from the slightest mechanical error or instance of bad luck: a cracked O-ring, an errant piece of space junk, an oxygen leak . . . There are a myriad of frighteningly probable events that would result in an astronaut’s death. In fact, twenty-one people who have attempted the journey have been killed.Yet for a special breed of individual, the call of space is worth the risk. Men such as U.S. astronauts Donald Pettit and Kenneth Bowersox, and Russian flight engineer Nikolai Budarin, who in November 2002 left on what was to be a routine fourteen-week mission maintaining the International Space Station.But then, on February 1, 2003, the Columbia exploded beneath them. Despite the numerous news reports examining the tragedy, the public remained largely unaware that three men remained orbiting the earth. With the launch program suspended indefinitely, these astronauts had suddenly lost their ride home.Too Far from Home chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth, ultimately settling on a plan that felt, at best, like a long shot.Latched to the side of the space station was a Russian-built Soyuz TMA-1 capsule, whose technology dated from the late 1960s (in 1971 a malfunction in the Soyuz 11 capsule left three Russian astronauts dead.) Despite the inherent danger, the Soyuz became the only hope to return Bowersox, Budarin, and Pettit home. Chris Jones writes beautifully of the majesty and mystique of space travel, while reminding us all how perilous it is to soar beyond the sky.
  • Chi
I really enjoyed reading this book. The writing is beautiful and very descriptive. It reads like a science fiction book. It is very fast-paced and easy reading.

In November 2002, ten astronauts left Earth aboard the space shuttle Columbia headed for the International Space Station (ISS). The mission was to depart much earlier, but problems, both technical and weather related, marred the launch. On one launch date, when the astronauts were already strapped-in in their seats aboard space shuttle Columbia, bad weather in their emergency landing site in Spain prevented the launch. The astronauts had to return home. On another occasion, a technical fault cancelled the launch. When the new launch date in November was approaching, the astronauts were wandering if more problems would suddenly appear and prevent another launch. Some astronauts believed that the mission had a bad luck aura around it, but did not discuss it openly. One astronaut had told his relatives that he was never coming back home again!

The launch did take place on November 2002, and to spectators on the ground and to the astronauts aboard Columbia the launch was routine and successful. But cameras aboard Columbia transmitted a different image to Mission Control. A piece was dislodged during the launch and hit critical heat shields located underside the shuttle. After reviewing the tape hundreds of times, Mission Control concluded that the piece must have bounced off the underside of the shuttle causing no damage.

On February 1, 2003, only seven of the ten astronauts were heading back to Earth aboard Columbia after bidding farewell to the three astronauts they left behind in the International Space Station. Sadly, they never made it back home. On re-entry, as witnessed by millions of spectators worldwide, Columbia exploded, killing all seven astronauts onboard. Contrary to what Mission Control thought at first, the heat shields were damaged during the launch. The three astronauts left behind in the International Space Station -- Donald Petit, Kenneth Bowersox, and Russian flight engineer Nikolai Budarin -- found themselves too far from home, stranded on the International Space Station!

Mission Controls in Houston and Moscow worked around the clock to bring back the astronauts safely. Launching another Space Shuttle was not an option, since further NASA space shuttle launches were suspended for months, perhaps years. There was also the problem of how to provide the stranded astronauts with enough supplies while they remained in space. Ultimately, they had to settle to a plan that, according to the author, was risky to say the least. Latched to the side of the space station was a Russian-built Soyuz TMA-1 capsule with outdated technology and, according to the Americans, a questionable safety record. In 1971 a malfunction in the Soyuz 11 capsule left three Russian cosmonauts dead (However, as one reviewer on amazon.com pointed out, all Soyuz crews since that mission have worn full pressure suits during launch and entry as a safeguard against that failure happening again). Furthermore, the Soyuz TMA-1 capsule hadn't been flight tested before (there was never a need to use it)! However, as far as the Russians were concerned, the Soyuz was safe and the only way to bring the astronauts back home.

Despite the inherent danger, the Soyuz became the only hope to return Bowersox, Budarin, and Petit home. Interestingly, though, the three astronauts had such a great time aboard the International Space Station that none of them wanted to return home when they were relieved. Aboard the Soyuz, the three astronauts eventually took "an accelerated, lung-crushing dive" back to earth. Their account aboard the Soyuz is remarkable, and will leave you gasping for air!

The author goes back to the history of the space race with Russia; with the first Russian in space; to animals sent in rockets to space; Neil Armstrong's walk on the moon; the Russian space station; and finally to the International Space Station. You will learn a lot of things about life in space that you probably did not know about, assuming you have not read such material before like me. For example, many early astronauts aboard space stations felt lonely and depressed and longed for home. All the earlier astronauts retired from NASA soon after their return from space! Two astronauts actually went on strike for a whole day while on a space station, and refused to continue their mission. They too retired from NASA on their return. However, the Russian cosmonauts fared much better. They adapted well to the loneliness and confines of space, unlike their American counterparts. According to the author, this is due to the simple life of the Russians as compared to the luxurious and comfortable life Americans lead and are used to.

You will learn a lot about the amazing beauty of a space walk, and how astronauts are so mesmerized by the beauty that they forget themselves, floating as in a trance towards Earth. One astronaut almost was lost in this way if it wasn't for another astronaut pulling him back! I actually went to my video store and bought an Imax DVD of a spacewalk! On the funny side, you'll learn how astronauts "take a crap" in zero gravity, and some quite embarrassing situations!

Here's some negative criticism from other reviewers on amazon.com:

"This author skips around with what in the movie business would be called flashbacks; a few of these are fine but I think this author over used them."

"Felt like there was a little too much effort put into making this into a Manly Tale. Everything seems a little too exaggerated -- the spicy language, the icy fear, the burning decisions. Maybe this style would have held up without question in a magazine, but at the novel's length, I kept wondering, "How do you know?" The little details started to feel like some of them were imagined or embellished; the writing was popping me out of being lost in the scene."

Overall, I highly recommend this book if you have never read non-fiction books on space before.
  • watchman
I always wanted to be an astronaut. But being born legally blind, that was not to be. So I pursued a degree in aerospace engineering, and for years, focused on the technical side of spaceflight. I've read many articles and books about how the shuttle, Soyuz, and the ISS work.

This book is really not about that, and that is why I enjoyed it so much.

This book is about the people involved in a very dramatic story. It's about the three men who were left stranded aboard the International Space Station when Columbia was lost, and the men and women whose lives and decisions surrounded theirs. Each man's character comes through clearly over the course of the book, as if you're getting to know them in person, and you come to appreciate the story more because of what you have been shown of these men. When the book ends, you want to hear Ken Bowersox give a quiet, thoughtful, and introspective lecture. You want to have Don Pettit teach you something--anything!--that you don't already know or understand. And you want to give Nikolai Budarin a big hug and have a drink with him, just because that man seems that cool. (Bowersox was probably a great mission commander, but I'd fly anywhere with Budarin. He seems the sort who could land a washing machine. If Hemingway had created Budarin, I doubt I'd have found him believable.)

These characters--and the others, especially Anne Bowersox and Micki Pettit--make this a very different sort of space book than those so full of technical details and explanations. As a result, this book captivated me in a way the more technical books never could, and I suspect that readers without any background or previous knowledge of the space program would find it very accessible and captivating.

I recommend this book very highly.
  • Cordalas
Loved it. Chris Jones rules the nonfiction world.
  • Darkraven
This is a very telling version of what actually happens in our space program. While we desperately need the space program, it is scary how easily our very dedicated and talented astronauts can be harmed or killed in their jobs. My commendations to them for their courage and pride in their work. I very much enjoyed this book. It is an easy read.
  • Painbrand
I really enjoyed this book. I have always had an interest in the space program since I grew up in Florida and would watch most launches when I was in grade school. There were just a few parts of the book that might not be totally accurate due to the writers background as a sports writer and that is why I gave 4 stars. Happy reading!
  • Xirmiu
One of the astronauts in the book is a personal friend..Don Pettit so fascinating to read this story