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Download Review of the EPA's Economic Analysis of Final Water Quality Standards for Nutrients for Lakes and Flowing Waters in Florida (Water Infrastructure) eBook

by National Research Council,Division on Earth and Life Studies,Water Science and Technology Board,Committee to Review EPA's Economic Analysis of Final Water Quality Standards for Nutrients for Lakes and Flowing Waters in Florida

Download Review of the EPA's Economic Analysis of Final Water Quality Standards for Nutrients for Lakes and Flowing Waters in Florida (Water Infrastructure) eBook
ISBN:
0309254930
Author:
National Research Council,Division on Earth and Life Studies,Water Science and Technology Board,Committee to Review EPA's Economic Analysis of Final Water Quality Standards for Nutrients for Lakes and Flowing Waters in Florida
Category:
Engineering
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Academies Press (July 5, 2012)
Pages:
142 pages
EPUB book:
1977 kb
FB2 book:
1978 kb
DJVU:
1258 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
414


The Environmental Protection Agency's estimate of the costs associated with implementing numeric nutrient criteria in Florida's waterways was significantly lower than many stakeholders expected.

Such an analysis would have more accurately described which pollutant sources, for example municipal wastewater treatment plants or agricultural operations, would bear the costs over time under the different rules an. .

Such an analysis would have more accurately described which pollutant sources, for example municipal wastewater treatment plants or agricultural operations, would bear the costs over time under the different rules and would have better illuminated the uncertainties in making such cost estimates. The Environmental Protection Agency's estimate of the costs associated with implementing numeric nutrient criteria in Florida's waterways was significantly lower than many stakeholders expected

Committee Membership Information Dr. Shabman is a past member of the NRC Water Science and .

Committee Membership Information. Dr. Shabman received his P. degree in agricultural economics from Cornell University. Otto C. Doering - (Vice Chair) Purdue University. His technical expertise is in water quality and wastewater permitting, with additional experience in drinking water, solid waste, and hazardous waste.

Waters in Florida The Environmental Protection Agencys estimate of the costs associated with implementing numeric . Box 1. Narrative Standards and Numeric Nutrient Criteria.

Waters in Florida The Environmental Protection Agencys estimate of the costs associated with implementing numeric nutrient criteria in Floridas waterways was significantly lower than many stakeholders expected. Florida currently uses a narrative standard that states in no case shall nutrient concentrations of a body of water be altered so as to cause an imbalance in natural populations of aquatic flora and fauna. Implementing this standard involves carrying out detailed biological assessments for individual waterbodies.

The Committee evaluated the cost estimates of implementing the numeric criteria vs. the current narrative standard for nutrients, including the relevance and validity of assumptions and methods, giving special attention to discrepancies between EPA’s analysis and those of several stakeholder groups.

USEPA (2010) Technical support document for .

National Academy Press, WashingtonGoogle Scholar. Netusil NR et al (2014) Valuing water quality in urban watersheds: a comparative analysis of Johnson Creek, Oregon, and Burnt Bridge Creek, Washington. USEPA (2010) Technical support document for . EPA’s final rule for numeric criteria for nitrogen/phosphorus pollution in Florida’s inland surface fresh waters. Office of Water, WashingtonGoogle Scholar. USEPA (2012) National summary of state information.

As in other waters, natural water quality characteristics in some wetlands may be outside the range established .

As in other waters, natural water quality characteristics in some wetlands may be outside the range established for uses designated in State standards. These water quality characteristics may require the development of criteria that reflect the natural background conditions in a specific wetland or wetland type. Examples of some of the wetland characteristics that may fall into this category are dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, color, and hydrogen sulfide. Many wetlands, through their assimilative capacity for nutrients and sediment, also serve an important water quality control function for nonpoint source pollution effects on waters adjacent to, or downstream of, the wetlands.

Washington, DC : National Academy of Sciences, 2012. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences, 2012.

Staff, Division on Earth and Life Studies. Staff, Water Science and Technology Board. Water quality : characteristics, modeling, modification, by: Tchobanoglous, George. Water resources: health, environment and development/ Published: (1999).

National Network of Reference Watersheds National Water Quality Monitoring Council (NWQMC) Advisory Committee for Water Information (ACWI) Present proposal to NWQMC - approved May 2011 Present proposal. Managing Complexity: Implementing an Ecosystem Restoration Program.

The Environmental Protection Agency's estimate of the costs associated with implementing numeric nutrient criteria in Florida's waterways was significantly lower than many stakeholders expected. This discrepancy was due, in part, to the fact that the Environmental Protection Agency's analysis considered only the incremental cost of reducing nutrients in waters it considered "newly impaired" as a result of the new criteria-not the total cost of improving water quality in Florida. The incremental approach is appropriate for this type of assessment, but the Environmental Protection Agency's cost analysis would have been more accurate if it better described the differences between the new numeric criteria rule and the narrative rule it would replace, and how the differences affect the costs of implementing nutrient reductions over time, instead of at a fixed time point. Such an analysis would have more accurately described which pollutant sources, for example municipal wastewater treatment plants or agricultural operations, would bear the costs over time under the different rules and would have better illuminated the uncertainties in making such cost estimates.