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Download Crossing & Cruising: From the Golden Era of Ocean Liners to the Luxury Cruise Ships of Today eBook

by John Maxtone-Graham

Download Crossing & Cruising: From the Golden Era of Ocean Liners to the Luxury Cruise Ships of Today eBook
ISBN:
0684191547
Author:
John Maxtone-Graham
Category:
Transportation
Language:
English
Publisher:
Scribner's; First American Edition edition (September 1, 1992)
Pages:
311 pages
EPUB book:
1374 kb
FB2 book:
1187 kb
DJVU:
1931 kb
Other formats
mobi lit docx doc
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
745


The Only Way to Cross, John Maxtone-Graham's classic history of the great transatlantic liners, was published twenty .

The Only Way to Cross, John Maxtone-Graham's classic history of the great transatlantic liners, was published twenty years ag. What you will not learn from this book is anything similar to the following: Between 1985 and 2010 (26 years inclusive), 177 cruise-liners are listed as having ‘retired’ from active cruising and you may judge the associated statistics for yourself. 107 of these ships were broken up (. scrapped) at the end of their lives. These were all in poor shape and could not be used at sea any more and yet, had all recently been carrying hundreds of passengers. 18 of the remainder were lost because they sank.

Crossing and Cruising book. The master authority on ocean liners, John Maxtone-Graham now tells. Crossing and Cruising: From the Golden Era of Ocean Liners to the Luxury Cruise Ships of Today. by. John Maxtone-Graham.

Crossing and Cruising : From the Decline of Yesterday's Ocean Liners to the Rise of the Cruise Ships of Today. by John Maxtone-Graham.

John Maxtone-Graham, a New Jersey-born naval historian whose books and shipboard lectures evoked the lost glamour of trans-Atlantic ocean liners, died on Monday in Manhattan. He was 85. The cause was respiratory failure, his wife, Mary, said. Mr. Maxtone-Graham’s nautical calling began inauspiciously. His first ocean voyage, eastbound on the liner Minnewaska when he was 6 months old, was a result of the stock market crash of 1929, which prompted his parents to move to London. Shuttling between hemispheres as a child in the 1930s, he was frequently seasick.

Cruising for trouble : cruise ships as soft targets for pirates, terrorists, and common criminals Mark Gaouette ; foreword by Kendall Carver. Download book Crossing & cruising : from the golden era of ocean liners to the luxury cruise ships of today, John Maxtone-Graham.

The Only Way to Cross, John Maxtone-Graham's classic history of the great transatlantic liners, was published twenty years ago, followed in 1985 by Liners to the Sun, his colorful sequel about life aboard cruise ships. Now, with Crossing & Cruising, he completes his definitive survey of passenger-ship travel, showing how the elegant "crossings" of the past gave way to the extravagant cruises of today.

The cruise ships that best recreate the romance and glamour of the golden age of ocean liners. Queen Mary 2 is the only true ocean liner sailing today, built for speed and style. Luxury all-inclusive ship Crystal Serenity recreates the glamour of the 1930s. Take a 12-day mid-Atlantic crossing with Viking Cruises from Lisbon to Miami. By Caroline Hendrie For The Mail On Sunday. Published: 17:01 EST, 18 November 2017 Updated: 17:01 EST, 18 November 2017.

The book traces the history of the ocean liner through the 1920s and 30s, the Golden Years of sea travel .

Finally, the book looks at the 2010 cruising season in the Port of Southampton with the naming ceremonies of the P&O Azura and Celebrity Cruises Celebrity Eclipse in April 2010 and the new Cunard Queen Elizabeth in October 2010.

A cruise ship is a large passenger ship used for oceans voyages in which the voyage itself, the ship's amenities, and usually the different destinations (ports of call) along the way each form part of the passengers' experience. Transportation from one port or another is usually not the main purpose of the voyage. The act of "cruising," particularly on voyages that return passengers to their originating port are sometimes known as "closed-loop" cruises.

The Only Way to Cross, John Maxtone-Graham's classic history of the great transatlantic liners, was published twenty years ago, followed in 1985 by Liners to the Sun, his colorful sequel about life aboard cruise ships. Now, with Crossing & Cruising, he completes his definitive survey of passenger-ship travel, showing how the elegant "crossings" of the past gave way to the extravagant cruises of today.From the steerage ordeal of emigrants bound for New York to the "huddled masses" who sail on seven-day cruises, Maxtone-Graham ranges back and forth over the years, re-creating the grandeur of a lost era and detailing the corporate maneuvers of the 1980s. Here are the ships and their stories: the stellar career of Aquitania, the great four-stacker that survived three million sea miles and two world wars; the art deco luxe of Normandie, French dream liner of the 193Os; and the rebirth of fabled France as Norway, closing the circle on an immortal ship that once crossed but now cruises. Here, too, are the marvels and problems of contemporary cruising: the sleek lines of customized ships, the crews that man them, and the corporate high jinks that drive the industry to seek ever larger markets.More than just vivid social history, Crossing & Cruising cultures what it was really like on board then and now - the sophisticated ambience of Cunard and White Star, the crowded squalor belowdecks, and the Formica and glass of today's liners. Rich in detail, broad in scope, Crossing & Cruising is a voyage in itself, evoking salt air, cabin lore, deckchair wisdom, shipyard savvy, and marketing guile. Sail as a fellow passenger with an entertaining guide who knows his ships well and loves them all.
  • Fesho
The author knows and loves cruise ships and the now defunct "passenger liner" and his insights gleaned from many months at sea on these vessels is related in elegant and fascinating prose. One reviewer had complained that the author had a choppy presentation, depending too much upon his personal experiences on various vessels rather than scholarly research. First of all, he has shown a wealth of book-learning about the subject and his opiniond of the modern cruise ships on which he has sailed are informed by this research. I don't find his views idiosyncratic, but quite astute. I wish the book had been updated to reflect the cruise ships and industry of the 20 years since this work was published, but one can look forward to more on this topic from the prolific author.
  • Modimeena
As a shipwreck historian (it’s what I do) I study ships of all types and sizes. Currently engaged on a huge project involving the history of passenger-ships, my never-ending quest for information in recent years has favoured that particular genre. Although published in 1992, I came to this work because of the sub-title which reads; “From the golden era of ocean liners to the luxury cruise ships of today” in the expectation of finding an historical treatise on the subject. It is no such thing.

This is the third work by Maxtone-Graham to cross my desk recently and each of these informs the reader he is the quintessential expert, the fount of all knowledge, the very sage itself - when it comes to the subject of big passenger-ships. Instead of learning anything of real value, however, his writing might easily be described as the perfunctory outpourings of those back-room people who are paid to produce promotional literature. The sort of people who are employed to make a company look good, make defeat look like a victory and annihilation like a temporary setback. In this particular book, we are subjected to a no-holds-barred view through the rosiest of tinted spectacles of how good cruising is and nothing else.

Whereas he does occasionally mention yesterday, he does so in a style which does not seek to teach the reader of the historical context or of the technology of the day. Instead it centres on the hardships and privations of the steerage-class passenger which is then used as a platform for returning to his self-appointed theme of how good it is today. Were he selling the product it would amount to subliminal advertising.

There is a lot which is right with cruising and cruise-ships and much that is very wrong. From this work, however, we are subjected to an annoyingly sycophantic repetition of preaching from the pulpit of big ship travel in which the author extols the benefits of how good cruising is now when compared to how bad it was then. It is a message which almost demands the reader partake in a modern cruise just so that their ancestors may now rest easy…

I am mindful of the publication date of 1992 when providing the following statistics - which I have readily to hand. Similar figures for the 26 years to 1992 would take far too long to produce. Nevertheless, the message is clear.

What you will not learn from this book is anything similar to the following: Between 1985 and 2010 (26 years inclusive), 177 cruise-liners are listed as having ‘retired’ from active cruising and you may judge the associated statistics for yourself. 107 of these ships were broken up (i.e. scrapped) at the end of their lives. These were all in poor shape and could not be used at sea any more and yet, had all recently been carrying hundreds of passengers. 18 of the remainder were lost because they sank. Another 19 were lost to fire - with three of those also sinking. Two ran aground, one capsized, one broke in two at anchor, one was abandoned, two are shown as ‘fate unknown’ and 26 are recorded as having changed their role. Of the latter, two became floating hotels but most of the remainder became freighters, passenger-ships or ferries - mostly in third world countries where the requisite safety regulations are not so strict. That’s OK then! A swift analysis reveals: An average of 7 ships every year ceased operating as cruise-ships. Of these, 23.7% (almost one in four!!!) came to an unfortunate end through sinking, fire or simply falling apart. Although there were four years in which no vessel was lost to accident or misfortune, there were seven when at least three met a very tragic end.

These statistics are deliberately included in order to redress the extremely biased, one-sided, pleasant-dreamy-eyed view of cruising in this lengthy piece of promotional blurb.

NM