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Download Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820–1920 eBook

by Joan Druett

Download Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820–1920 eBook
ISBN:
1584651598
Author:
Joan Druett
Category:
Transportation
Language:
English
Publisher:
UPNE; 1st edition (August 1, 2001)
Pages:
219 pages
EPUB book:
1616 kb
FB2 book:
1814 kb
DJVU:
1103 kb
Other formats
docx lrf mobi txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
948


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Petticoat Whalers: Whalin. has been added to your Cart

Petticoat Whalers: Whalin. has been added to your Cart. Very good, gives a really good view of life at sea, the good and the bad. It is more oriented to be presented from the female perspective, but along with that, it gives a great insight into life on the whale boats, men and women- and regular daily life, along with occasional intense action.

Surprisingly, by 1850 roughly a sixth of all whaling vessels carried the captains' wives.

Petticoat Whalers Whaling Wives at Sea,.

Joan Druett was born in Nelson, and raised in Palmerston North . 1992: John Lyman Award for Best Book of American Maritime History for Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820–1920.

Her first book, Exotic Intruders, was the result of a publisher's request for a book about the introduction to New Zealand of plants and animals by sailing ships.

Home Joan Druett Petticoat Whalers, Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920. Petticoat Whalers, Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920. This is the colourful tale of the whaling ships that plied the Pacific, Atlantic and Antarctic oceans in the nineteenth century, and the men and women who worked and lived on them. Women? Yes - an extraordinary number did accompany their husband-skippers on their long and perilous voyages, despite danger, privation and the undoubted brutality of the trade.

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Free Essay: Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 .

Free Essay: Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 was written by Joan Druett, and originally published in cloth by Collins Publishers Ne. .

Joan Druett offers an informed and accessible account of little known stories of wives of whaling captains who accompanied their husbands on long and arduous journeys to bring whale oil and blubber to New England. Surprisingly, by 1850 roughly a sixth of all whaling vessels carried the captains' wives. Invariably the only woman aboard a very cramped ship, they endured harsh conditions to provide companionship for their husbands, and sometimes even exerted a strong unofficial moral influence on a rowdy crew. Joan Druett provides captivating portraits of many of these wives and the difficult circumstances they endured.Petticoat Whalers, first published in New Zealand in 1991, has been out of print since 1995. The Kendall Whaling Museum's L. Byrne Waterman Award citation states: "It is not insignificant that Petticoat Whalers is already an indispensable classic, and [Druett's] other books and articles have earned the status of Basic Necessities on any well-stocked shelf of maritime narratives and reference works."
  • Ndlaitha
I really liked this book and thought the adventures were amazing, but thank God I was born in this century and didn't depend on the whaling industry for many products.
  • Hidden Winter
Very good, gives a really good view of life at sea, the good and the bad. It is more oriented to be presented from the female perspective, but along with that, it gives a great insight into life on the whale boats, men and women- and regular daily life, along with occasional intense action.
  • Marirne
Great information on the subject of the Whaling industry in general and even better genealogical information for those with family ties to the whaleship captains, wives & crew. I found a previously unknown family whaler in this book and discovered more whaling relatives within it's pages.
On a purely historical note the description of the hard lives led by all involved in the whale trade was interesting & informative.
  • Kearanny
No issues with this order, came as described.
  • spacebreeze
The best examination of women in the whaling industry, not a page-turner but fascinating and informative
  • Wnex
very enjoyable read for those who are interested in the lives and hardships of women during the great whaling days.
  • MisterMax
I really would have liked to rate this book higher because I have an strong interest in the subject but can't because of the writing.

Two major problems. First this is a topic the cries out for a linear story but the author chops it up and jumps from time period to time period and back again. I assume her rational is that here sources are journals and diaries but if you are new to this literature it can be confusing.

Second problem is the omission of a brief history of U.S. Whalefishing, it was not refered to as Whaleing during it's active period. There is no mention of the fact the Whale Oil was the biggist American export until King Cotton of the early 19th. Century. The time period od which the author write is really the decline of Whalefishing in the United States and the of oil in western Pa., and it biproduct Kerosene that replaced Whale Oil as a fuel.
Explorations of women's relationship to the sea are rare - but growing. This book is a valuable foundation stone. I know this because of my involvement in women's maritime history, which has become a new and important sub-discipline of maritime history. It has a home at the Women and the Sea Network (which I co-ordinate), based at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich UK. Joan Druett's book was the first to explore women on whalers - who were there mainly as wives and daughters of captains. I especially enjoyed reading about 'gamming' - the way these women gossiped with each other when they met, being rowed over to each others ships, dressing up, taking tea, exchanging presents. I also enjoyed her novel Abigail (Macmillan New Zealand, 1988), which is about a very spirited woman, daughter of a whaling captain, and her connections with the whaling industry, incl whaling lovers. Reading both books in tandem gave me a very good picture of women in that branch of maritime industry. Thanks. I loved them both and look forward to reading Joan's new book Hen Frigates, about women on non-whaling ships.