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Download Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan eBook

by Ann Jones

Download Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan eBook
ISBN:
0805078843
Author:
Ann Jones
Category:
Asia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Metropolitan Books; 1st edition (March 21, 2006)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1194 kb
FB2 book:
1713 kb
DJVU:
1637 kb
Other formats
azw lrf mbr lit
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
534


Электронная книга "Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan", Ann Jones

Электронная книга "Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan", Ann Jones. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Ann Jones explores the lives of people left behind after the long series of (and continuing) war in Afghanistan. She also provides the political background of the present tragic state of affairs the affect the women and children who try to survive in Kabul. But, in short, I would recommend this book to anyone who seeks to understand the state of Afghanistan and the foreign elements who both try to improve and destroy this magnificent country. This book covers just enough of the Afghani experience to introduce the Western reader to a very different cultural context that most Westerners (myself included) could not begin to fathom without the author's vivid and interpretive assistance.

Kabul in Winter book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ann Jones, writer and photographer, is the author of seven previous books, including War Is Not Over When It's Over, Kabul in Winter, Women Who Kill, and Next Time She'll Be Dead

Ann Jones, writer and photographer, is the author of seven previous books, including War Is Not Over When It's Over, Kabul in Winter, Women Who Kill, and Next Time She'll Be Dead. Since 9/11, Jones has worked with women in conflict and post-conflict zones, principally Afghanistan, and reported on their concerns. An authority on violence against women, she has served as a gender adviser to the United Nations. Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The New York Times and The Nation.

Ann Jones is the author of eight books, including Women Who Kill, Next Time She'll Be Dead, and Looking for Lovedu. An authority on women and violence, her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The New York Times and The Nation. Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan.

New York : Metropolitan. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio). Uploaded by MerciG on November 19, 2010.

Ann Jones takes up the human side of the war in Afghanistan. I was compelled to read this book because pretending its content doesn't exist is impossible

Ann Jones takes up the human side of the war in Afghanistan. She deftly intertwines history with her own experience teaching English in Kabul and writes a book that is both gripping and profoundly moving. It also tackles the vexing issue of humanitarian aid and why sometimes our best efforts don't succeed. Winter in Kabul is a brave book. I was compelled to read this book because pretending its content doesn't exist is impossible. Kabul in Winter is essential reading for anyone who thinks of themselves as a humanitarian. Not for the faint of heart. com User, April 8, 2006.

In December 2002, Ann Jones flew to Afghanistan and volunteered her services to a small charity. Kabul in Winter" is three things at once. It is, in its own way, a travel book. It was a year after the United States, in hot pursuit of Osama bin Laden, had ended its bombing of the countryside. Somehow I felt obliged to try to help pick up the pieces," writes Jones, a journalist and the author of "Women Who Kill. Jones, a keen observer, captures her surroundings in crisp vignettes, some appalling, others quite comic.

Ann Jones talked about her book [Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in. .

Ann Jones talked about her book, published by Metropolitan Books. She described her trip to Afghanistan in 2002 where she volunteered as an aid worker in prisons and schools and taught English to Kabul’s educators. Ms. Jones recounted her interaction with Afghan women and described them as runaway child brides and victims of rape and physical violence. After her presentation she answered audience members' questions. Ann Jones talked about her book Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace in Afghanistan, published by Metropolitan Books.

Life Without Peace in Afghanistan. Praise for Kabul in Winter. A work of impassioned reportage, a sympathetic observer's damage assessment of a country torn apart by warlords, religious fanatics, and ill-advised superpower conflicts dating back more than a century. Eloquent and persuasive.

A sharp and arresting people's-eye view of real life in Afghanistan after the Taliban Soon after the bombing of Kabul ceased, award-winning journalist and women's rights activist Ann Jones set out for the shattered city, determined to bring help where her country had brought destruction. Here is her trenchant report from inside a city struggling to rise from the ruins. Working among the multitude of impoverished war widows, retraining Kabul's long-silenced English teachers, and investigating the city's prison for women, Jones enters a large community of female outcasts: runaway child brides, pariah prostitutes, cast-off wives, victims of rape. In the streets and markets, she hears the Afghan view of the supposed benefits brought by the fall of the Taliban, and learns that regarding women as less than human is the norm, not the aberration of one conspicuously repressive regime. Jones confronts the ways in which Afghan education, culture, and politics have repeatedly been hijacked--by Communists, Islamic fundamentalists, and the Western free marketeers--always with disastrous results. And she reveals, through small events, the big disjunctions: between U.S promises and performance, between the new "democracy" and the still-entrenched warlords, between what's boasted of and what is. At once angry, profound, and starkly beautiful, Kabul in Winter brings alive the people and day-to-day life of a place whose future depends so much upon our own.
  • Hiclerlsi
This is a scorcher of a book and Ann Jones is a brilliant writer who makes the brutality of life in Afghanistan so real that the people she writes about jump off the page and into your head and heart. Jones, a journalist, went to Afghanistan to work with an international NGO (nongovernmental organization) that seeks to improve the lives of Afghan women and children. This is a mission that seems impossible, given all the constraints, both cultural and political, that are brought to bear on any logical effort to address the grinding poverty and despair in this unhappy place.

Some reviewers have criticized Jones's account as naive, asserting that she does not take into account the political realities surrounding Afghanistan, but that is exactly the reason that I found her book so compelling. From Jones we get no excuses or rationalizations as to why Afghanistan is a perennial pawn in the "great game" of world power. And she makes few apologies for a culture that dehumanizes women and girls, the first step to making it OK for men to trade and treat them like animals (or worse). Jones tells it like it is, which is a very different story than we get from governments and the entrenched international development professionals. Jones was an eyewitness to how big development plans play out on the ground, and she relays her truth in a style that is as unsparing as the rigid, tribal rules that impede progress.

This book is wrenching and at times painful to read, but I argue that it is important for anyone who wants to have a full view of our world today and the events that are currently shaping it. While it's clearly true that Ann Jones has an alternate take on the reasons behind Afghanistan's present, foul condition, hers is a voice that needs to be heard and her subjects are people whose stories deserve to be told.
  • energy breath
Apparently I took away somewhat different conclusions than did some of your reviewers. The book starts out a little slowly because there is a synopsis of Afghani history. One should definitely wade through it.

The author went to Kabul after the war against the Taliban in order to help get education for women up and running. Besides being a teacher, Ann Jones is a reporter, and she has done a lot of research for this book in addition to the actual time she spent teaching.

Having been one of the horrified people who wrote letters to Jimmy Carter when we supplied Stinger missiles to the Mujahadeen, I am well aware that both American political parties contributed to Afghani problems. Studying some of the history is required in order for us to pick our way gradually out of this flawed country while still leaving it better than we found it.

To blame the imperial powers (Russia, the US and Britain)for the problems in Afghanistan is way too easy. The book makes clear that there is a corrosive element to Afghani culture that needs to be gently excised as we help build schools and plant orchards. (We do plan to plant orchards, don't we?)

This book should be required reading for all policy makers from Obama and Biden to the State Department.
  • Justie
Ann Jones' "Kabul in Winter: Life Without Peace" is extraordinary: presenting the reality at its most granular level. She links the history of this tormented place from Alexander the Great to the geology created by the collision of the Indian and the Eurasian plates, creating the Hindu Kush where geology becomes destiny and models the complex interplay of the various factions.

Much like Frances Fitzgerald's "Fire in the Lake" about Vietnam, "Kabul in Winter" helps make Afghanistan understandable!
  • Anayanis
Ann Jones explores the lives of people left behind after the long series of (and continuing) war in Afghanistan. She also provides the political background of the present tragic state of affairs the affect the women and children who try to survive in Kabul.
Every person in the USA should read this book.
  • Dianalmeena
This book is definitely NOT for the faint of heart, or for true-believers in America-the-good or West-good, East-bad. Jones takes on institutions that have not only failed Afghanistan and failed women, but whose Machievelian hand can be seen in the deterioration of governments all over the globe whose first concern is not America's. She's done her homework, indeed, put her life on the line to do it, and this volume, if you have the courage to read it, will enlighten you in the most unexpected ways. I learned a lot from this most fascinating and readable book.
  • Mavegar
An informative book but a tedious read. The first part of the book deals with the history of this country. You almost feel like you should be taking notes in order to keep it all straight. The next part deals with the treatment of women....appalling by any standards. According to her, women simply have no voice and no rights. They are mere beasts of burden to be beaten, traded, enslaved, kept out of public view. Sadly, from what I've read about Afghanistan previously, I think this is accurate for the vast majority of women. This is a book I might refer to for its historical information, but not one I'll read again as I do so many of my other cherished books.