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Download The Rough Guide to Washington DC, Third Edition eBook

by Jules Brown

Download The Rough Guide to Washington DC, Third Edition eBook
ISBN:
1858288843
Author:
Jules Brown
Category:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rough Guides; 3rd edition (July 1, 2002)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1485 kb
FB2 book:
1389 kb
DJVU:
1553 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
106


Start by marking The Rough Guide to Washington DC as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Rough Guide to Washington DC as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The author has been a regular visitor to Washington DC for many years and gives the lowdown on all the neighbourhoods from historic Georgetown to trendy Adams-Morgan, plus topical angles on history, politics and city development. Full-colour maps give coverage of every region of the city.

Jules Brown (Goodreads Author), Jeff D. Dickey (Revised by. Washington DC: The Rough Guide (ebook). Published April 1st 2001 by Rough Guides Limited. Dickey (Revised by). ISBN: 1843534010 (ISBN13: 9781843534013). The Rough Guide to Washington, . Author(s): Jules Brown (Goodreads Author). ISBN: 1858288843 (ISBN13: 9781858288840). ISBN: 1858289351 (ISBN13: 9781858289359).

Discover Washington, D. s highlights with stunning photography and information on everything from the city's memorials and museums along the . Make the most of your vacation with The Rough Guide to Washington, D. C. Издательство: "Rough Guides" (2011). s highlights with stunning photography and information on everything from the city's memorials and museums along the Mall to showpieces like the International Spy Museum. Find detailed practical advice on what to see and do in Washington, D. relying on up-to-date descriptions of the best hotels, bars, clubs, shops and restaurants for all budgets. Формат: 130x200, 316 стр. ISBN: 978-1-40538-226-7. Купить за 25. руб на Озоне.

Find nearly any book by Jules Brown (page 2). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Rough Guides' Washington DC Directions 1 (Rough Guide Directions). by Jules Brown, Jeff Dickey. ISBN 9781843533948 (978-1-84353-394-8) Softcover, Rough Guides, 2005. Find signed collectible books: 'The Rough Guides' Washington DC Directions 1 (Rough Guide Directions)'.

Jules Brown is a veteran Rough Guide author, with eight guidebooks to his name, including Barcelona . Those are the examples I had to point out as a warning to people from outside DC who might be tempted to rely on this guide

Jules Brown is a veteran Rough Guide author, with eight guidebooks to his name, including Barcelona and England. Those are the examples I had to point out as a warning to people from outside DC who might be tempted to rely on this guide. There are other issues with the guide- a bit of snarkiness, and I'm not sure I'd consider Rock Creek Park, a nice city park, to be more of a must see than the Lincoln Memorial. If you need your green space, there are much better ways to get it, such as Great Falls or a short drive towards the mountains. Also, sights considered, for travel purposes, part of the DC area, such as Annapolis or Manassas, are ignored.

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free Jules Brown, Jeff Dickey. Frommer Washington, . Download books for free. Jules Brown, Jeff Dickey. Скачать (PDF) . Читать. Скачать (PDF) Смотреть папку .

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Marc Dubin, Rough Guides. Terry Richardson, Rough Guides.

There are chapters on bars and clubs; shopping; cafes; restaurants and a reworked chapter on the city"s music scene.

The Rough Guide to Washington DC (Rough Guide Travel Guides),Jules Brown, Jeff.

Also published as part of the Rough Guide to The USA.

INTRODUCTION

As a nations capital, Washington DC showtown USA and self-professed political arbiter of the Free World takes some beating. Along its triumphant avenues stand historic buildings that define a world view, while on either side of the central Mall sit the various museum buildings of the planets greatest cultural collection, the Smithsonian Institution. For an introduction to the United States or a crash course in politics, portraiture or paleontology look no further than the spacious, well-ordered, Neoclassical sweep that is downtown DC. With a population of less than 600,000 residents it comes way down the list of American cities, and is likewise outnumbered by just about every foreign capital you could think of. But though a small fry in terms of population, its not small in scale at all. Everywhere Washington boasts the bold expanses and monumental architecture of a carefully planned capital.

Given that it would become the consummate political power center, it seems fitting that DCs very founding was the result of political wrangle. In the late eighteenth century, Congress acceded to the demands of the Northern states to assume their Revolutionary War debts, but squeezed a key concession for the South: rather than being sited in one of the big Northern cities, the new federal capital would be built from scratch on the banks of the Potomac River, midway along the eastern seaboard. And while not actually in the Deep South, Washington in the Territory (later District) of Columbia was very definitely of the South. French architect Pierre LEnfant planned the city on a hundred-square-mile diamond-shaped piece of land donated by the tobacco-rich states of Virginia and Maryland; Virginia later demanded its chunk of land back, which is why theres a bite out of the diamond shape across the Potomac River. Slave labor drained the floodlands and erected the public buildings, and Virginian high society frequented the townhouses and salons that flourished after the government moved in during 1800.

But to paint DC as a Southern city is to miss the point. John F. Kennedy famously pointed out its contradictions in his waspish comment that Washington was "a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm." Even more important than its geographical location was its unique experimental nature a modern, planned capital built for a disparate collection of states seeking security in unity. As a symbol of union, its finest hour came within a generation of its founding the city that was built largely by slaves became the frontline headquarters of the fight against slavery, as Abraham Lincoln directed the Union troops from the capitals halls and offices. After the Civil War, thousands of Southern blacks arrived in search of a sanctuary from racist oppression and, initially, to some extent they found one. Racial segregation was banned in public places and Howard University, the first US institution of higher learning that enrolled black people, was set up in 1867. By the 1870s African-Americans made up over a third of the Districts population, but as poverty and squalor worsened, official segregation was reintroduced in 1920, banning blacks from government buildings and the jobs they had come to find.

Since the 1930s, DC has been both a predominantly black city and a federal fortress. Shunned by the white political aristocracy, the city is run as a virtual colony of Congress, where residents have only nonvoting representation and couldnt even participate in presidential elections until the 1960s. Suffering an endless cycle of boom and bust, the city has one of the countrys highest crime rates and appalling levels of unemployment, illiteracy and drug abuse. Fed rates and appalling levels of unemployment, illiteracy and drug abuse. Federal government money props up the city, pays its administrators and affects virtually every aspect of local commerce and industry. That fact is galling in the extreme to the majority of American citizens, to whom "Washington" is a dirty word, a place inhabited only by self-seeking politicians isolated within the fabled Beltway, the ring road that circles the city and is used as a metaphor for all thats different about DC.

Meanwhile, twenty million visitors come to Washington each year for fun, making it one of the most visited tourist destinations in the country. Kept away from the citys peripheral dead zones, they tour a scrubbed, policed and largely safe downtown swathe where famous landmark White House, US Capitol, Washington Monument follows world-class museum National Air and Space Museum, National Gallery of Art with unending and uplifting regularity. Even better, most of what you see in Washington is free, and getting around (on a subsidized transport system that has few equals in the United States) is easy. True, a sense of community, or even neighborhood, is rare especially downtown, where the entire place falls strangely silent after 6pm and on weekends. But pockets of vitality do stand out, in historic Georgetown, arty Dupont Circle and trendy Adams-Morgan, where what nightlife there is shakes its fist at the otherwise conservative surroundings. Youll eat well, from a bounty of different cuisines, and nowhere will you be better informed about whats happening in America. Pick up the paper, switch on the TV or radio, and tune in to the thousands of broadcasters, lobbyists, journalists and politicians who shape the views of the world from this city of glorious compromise.

  • HelloBoB:D
I love the entire Rough Guide series of books! They have great maps, provide detail of all the different eating options, sightseeing options, have phone numbers, hours of operation... just everything you would need in one small book!! I've bought the Rough Guide for several different trips in different locations and always been very pleased!
  • Xanna
The rough guides dc is great because it contains a lot of sophisticated information and stories. It has a couple lists and tours, I believe, as well as stories. The book includes material on museum collections. This is great because instead of carrying around and wasting so many maps fliers, etc. You have one book with all you need (including maps) in an intelligent format. This book contains hostels, and hotels...Right up my alley.