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Download Scientists Anonymous: Great Stories of Women in Science eBook

by Patricia Fara

Download Scientists Anonymous: Great Stories of Women in Science eBook
ISBN:
1840465743
Author:
Patricia Fara
Category:
Biographies
Language:
English
Publisher:
Icon Books (January 1, 2007)
Pages:
213 pages
EPUB book:
1265 kb
FB2 book:
1835 kb
DJVU:
1305 kb
Other formats
lrf lrf mobi azw
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
813


Patricia Fara is a Fellow of Clare College at the University of Cambridge and works in the university's History and . The only failing of this book is that it cannot possibly fit all of the stories of forgotten scientists, nor adequately do each story justice - for that I think we are in need of a series.

Patricia Fara is a Fellow of Clare College at the University of Cambridge and works in the university's History and Philosophy of Science Department. An acclaimed author of adult popular science, she also wrote the first ever book on computers for children. I only wish it could be core reading in schools!

Scientists Anonymous book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Scientists Anonymous: Great Stories of Women in Science as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Scientists Anonymous book. Start by marking Scientists Anonymous: Great Stories of Women in Science as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Fara, Patricia (2002) Scientists Anonymous: Great Stories of Women in Science. Fara, Patricia (2003). Sex, Botany and Empire: The Story of Carl Linnaeus and Joseph Banks. Cambridge: Icon Books. Retrieved 22 February 2015. Fara, Patricia (2004) Pandora's Breeches: Women, Science and Power in the Enlightenment Pimlico Books. Fara, Patricia (2005) Fatal Attraction: Magnetic Mysteries of the Enlightenment Icon Books. Fara, Patricia (2009) Science: A Four Thousand Year History Oxford University Press. Fara, Patricia (2012)

The big names are here - Marie Curie, Florence Nightingale, Rosalind Franklin - alongside stories of brilliant women who have been forgotten, in a fascinating blend of history, science and biography.

The big names are here - Marie Curie, Florence Nightingale, Rosalind Franklin - alongside stories of brilliant women who have been forgotten, in a fascinating blend of history, science and biography. This book would be great for someone who is looking for ideas for a report on famous person. It gives just enough to give an idea about who each woman was and how they changed the world. Also good overall for young people who need to know that one person can make a big difference in the world.

Scientists Anonymous. Great Stories of Women in Science. POLITICIANS CLAIM THAT all children have equal opportunities, but among professional scientists there are still far fewer women than men. Published January 25, 2007 by Wizard Books. Internet Archive Wishlist.

Scientists Anonymous: Great Stories od Women in Science by Patricia Fara. Education of a Woman: The Life of Gloria Steinem. Anne Morrow Lindbergh: First Lady of the Air by Kathleen C. Winters. Outrageous Women of Civil War Times by Mary Rodd Furbee. Daughter of Heaven: The True Story of the Only Woman to Become Emperor of China by Nigel Cawthorne. Source(s): deb · 1 decade ago.

Coauthors & Alternates.

Sympathetic Attractions (Princeton Legacy Library). ISBN 9780691010991 (978-0-691-01099-1) Hardcover, Princeton University Press, 1996. Coauthors & Alternates.

Scientists Anonymous (Paperback). The big names are here – Marie Curie, Florence Nightingale, Rosalind Franklin – alongside stories of brilliant women who have been forgotten, in a fascinating blend of history, science and biography. You might also lik. ig Numbers by Mary Gribbin. Big Numbers is a brilliant and imaginative book for 10 to 12 year olds which paints a fascinating picture of the comparative scale of phenomena in our world, from the vast to the infinitesimal

Scientists Anonymous, by Patricia Fara. cc hewcobb pi. witter.

Story of Rosalind Franklin, from "Scientists Anonymous" by Patricia Fara (2005)pic. Scientists Anonymous, by Patricia Fara. 0 ответов 1 ретвит 2 отметки Нравится.

Profiles such renowned female scientists as Marie Curie, Florence Nightingale, and Rosalind Franklin, along with stories of lesser-known women in science whose discoveries have greatly impacted our world throughout history. Original.
  • Ricep
This book would be great for someone who is looking for ideas for a report on famous person. It gives just enough to give an idea about who each woman was and how they changed the world.
Also good overall for young people who need to know that one person can make a big difference in the world.
  • Kirizan
There is much of interest in Patricia Fara's book, but the author's single-minded determination to 'confirm' the basic thesis of her book leads to her giving incomplete, and sometimes misleading and inaccurate, accounts of events. The tone of the book is set from the beginning, in the chapter with the title "Present": "Many people argue that it is a waste of time teaching girls physics, because they are inherently incapable of grappling with mathematical equations and lack a good 3-D imagination." I have been interested in science, education and politics for longer than I care to remember and I have never heard, or read, anyone uttering this absurd notion in the terms expressed by Fara, let alone "many people".

It would take an essay to point out some of the deficiencies and over-simplifications in Fara's accounts, so a couple of examples will have to suffice. Fara includes Rosalind Franklin as an example of "women excluded because of her sex" from a Nobel Prize. But Franklin was dead when the relevant award was made, and it is a condition of the Prize that it is not awarded posthumously. On the astronomer "Joyce" [actually Jocelyn] Bell Burnell, Fara writes: "According to Burnell, she should have shared the Nobel Prize that was awarded to her [Ph.D} supervisor." But in an article that appeared in "Annals of the New York Academy of Science" in 1977, Bell Burnell gave her reasons why she disagreed with those who thought she should have been awarded a share in the Nobel, finishing "I believe it would demean Nobel Prizes if they were awarded to research students, except in very exceptional cases, and I do not believe this is one of them."

Finally, in relation to Einstein's first wife, Mileva Maric Einstein, Fara writes that she "was also a physicist". In fact Mileva Maric twice failed the Zurich Polytechnic diploma exam for teaching mathematics and physics in secondary school, and did not publish a single article on physics. Fara also writes: "Some historians claim that Mileva Einstein (1875-1948) was the true source of inspiration for Albert Einstein's revolutionary theories of physics." Contary to this assertion, not a single one of the published proponents of this claim is an historian of physics, science, or any other kind of historian.

Children should be presented with a rounded account of scientific events and scientists, not one too often verging on propaganda for a particular point of view.