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Download An Abundance of Katherines eBook

by Jeff Woodman,John Green

Download An Abundance of Katherines eBook
ISBN:
142332451X
Author:
Jeff Woodman,John Green
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (September 21, 2006)
EPUB book:
1262 kb
FB2 book:
1248 kb
DJVU:
1968 kb
Other formats
lrf docx mbr azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
102


John Green - An Abundance of Katherines Series . When Colin was about four, he read a book about Archimedes, the Greek philosopher who’d discovered that volume could be measured by water displacement when he sat down in the bathtub.

John Green - An Abundance of Katherines Series -. (Young Adult ) Katherine V thought boys were gross Katherine X just wanted to be friends Katherine XVIII dumped him in an e-mail K-19 broke his . Upon making this discovery, Archimedes supposedly shouted Eureka! 3 and then ran naked through the streets. The book said that many important discoveries contained a Eureka moment.

Michael L. Printz Honor Book Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist New York Times Bestseller

Michael L. Printz Honor Book Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist New York Times Bestseller. When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine. And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped. Nineteen times, to be exact. Colin is on a mission to prove The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship, avenge Dumpees everywhere, and finally win him the girl.

by John Green (Author), Jeff Woodman (Narrator). His many accolades include the Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and the Edgar Award. He has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize. John was selected by TIME magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World.

An Abundance of Katherines. Written by John Green. Narrated by Jeff Woodman. When it comes to relationships, everyone has a type. Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine. An Abundance of Katherines was a 2007 Michael L. Printz Honor book and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize

An Abundance of Katherines. He has dated–and been dumped by–19 Katherines. In the wake of The K-19 Debacle, Colin–an anagram-obsessed washed-up child prodigy–heads out on a road trip with his overweight, Judge Judy- loving friend Hassan. Printz Honor book and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. It was also named one of the books of the year by Booklist, Horn Book, and Kirkus.

An Abundance of Katherines is a young adult novel by John Green. Released in 2006, it was a finalist for the Michael L. Printz Award. The novel includes an appendix by Daniel Biss, a close friend to Green, explaining some of the more complex equations the main character, Colin, uses. Colin Singleton, a child prodigy, fears he will not maintain his genius as an adult. Over the span of his life, Colin has dated nineteen girls named Katherine, all spelled in that manner

The future is unpredictable. John Green, An Abundance of Katherines. John Green, An Abundance of Katherines

The future is unpredictable. What matters to you defines your mattering. you can never love someone as much as you miss them. I don’t think you can ever fill the empty space with the thing you lost. Katherine V thought boys were gross Katherine X just wanted to be friends Katherine XVIII dumped him in an e-mail K-19 broke his heart When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton's type happens to be girls named Katherine. Genres : Young Adult. On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washed-up child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight, Judge Judy-loving best friend riding shotgun-but no Katherines.

From the #1 bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars


Michael L. Printz Honor Book


Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist


When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine. And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped. Nineteen times, to be exact. On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washed-up child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight, Judge Judy–loving best friend riding shotgun―but no Katherines. Colin is on a mission to prove The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship, avenge Dumpees everywhere, and finally win him the girl. Love, friendship, and a dead Austro-Hungarian archduke add up to surprising and heart-changing conclusions in this ingeniously layered comic novel about reinventing oneself.



  • Doriel
Let me start this review by saying I'm a pretty big John Green fan. I started with Paper Towns, which I got as a gift, reading it in one sitting. I liked it so much that I went out and bought Looking for Alaska and read that in an all-nighter session, too. I loved Alaska. It covers the meaning of life while introducing three unforgettable characters: Pudge, The Colonel, and Alaska. And no, I didn't have to Google the names.
Everyone always talks about A Fault in our Stars, but I was more curious about Green's sophomore effort, An Abundance of Katherines. Unlike Paper Towns and Alaska, I didn't read this in one sitting. It took several sessions for me to get through this.
At first, I liked it well enough. We've got Colin, a depressed wannabe protege who has just been dumped for the umpteenth time by a Katherine, who is being pushed to get out and live by his lazy, underachieving friend, the comic relief character, Hassan. Hassan doesn't have a job and he has taken a year off before going to college. The two decide to take a road trip. Of course?
I'm not going to go through the plot, but let's just say it's very forgettable in comparison to Alaska. Will Colin learn that there is more to life than getting dumped by girls with the same name and find a cool new girl (perhaps with a different name)? Will Hassan learn the meaning of hard work?
Throughout the book we get a bunch of flashbacks to Colin's past relationships, but I can't say I was enthralled by these sections. They feel a bit pointless, and while some flashbacks are funny (like Colin getting dumped immediately by Katherine 1), most scenes just tend to drag because I found myself not caring.
Let me explain, the reason I loved Alaska and Paper Towns was because the characters were so lovable, but here, meh, I just didn't connect. Sure, Hassan is funny, but he feels one-dimensional. His shtick wore thin relatively quickly. Colin, well, I just found him to be a whiny s***, to be honest. He's a loser, like Pudge, but without the charm and mannerisms that made me connect with that character.
I think the main problem is that John Green wrote this in third-person, as opposed to first-person. The writing feels more distant. I just didn't buy what I was reading. Whereas, even the scenes in Alaska that felt made-up at least had a lovable humor or character developing aspect to them. Here, everything kind of feels forced.
That's not to say I hated this book or anything, but in comparison to Green's other work, it feels clunky. And the ending, while nice, doesn't have the same moral impact or twist as his other works had. Overall, I'd skip this unless you're a Green Completist.
  • Flamehammer
Let me begin by saying I am a fan of John Green's writing and, honestly of John Green, himself. I've seen him speak to teachers at a conference, follow his Twitter, and occasionally watch videos posted by him and his brother. I purchased this book at the same time as others 3+ years ago- reading The Fault in our Stars first, then Paper Towns and then, Looking for Alaska. As sometimes happens with buying too many Kindle books at one time, I assumed I had read An Abundance of Katherines, but actually hadn't. Maybe because it is the most recently read and it's the story I want to tell myself but I've decided this one is the one I like the best of the works I have read of John Green. All of his books involve characters uncovering their "truth with a capital t" - about connecting with the human condition in touching, funny, memorable, and deeply meaningful ways. Each of his stories involves the character connecting with life through an odd, adorable nerd/dork fascination with an attention to detail that is remarkable and leaves me more knowledgeable even if I didn't think I needed to know so much about maps/mathematical theorems/a particular novel's author/famous last words. An Abundance of Katherines did not disappoint and proved/helped me re-remember that John Green is a magician with words, connects to the insecure teenager still within all of us, and can make us laugh while crying at the same time. I am really looking forward to reading Turtles All the Way Down - hoping it will become my new favorite.
  • Ffel
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green is a decent choice for young adults. It describes how a relationship can change a person and can help with understanding what is meaningful and not. This is a pretty easy read but also can be difficult. The first few chapters are kind of boring due to explaining the story. It was hard for me to get into the book because of those first few chapters. If you can handle the main character whining, this will be a good choice for you. It can get annoying because I felt that was all the author knew how to write about. It took me 3 weeks to read the book because I had school and other activities going on, but anyone could get through this book within a week. I don’t suggest this book because the story line is not an attention grabber. John Green usually writes really interesting stories but An Abundance of Katherines is slow. If you enjoy slow story lines that you can follow and understand, this would be a decent choice. He does include going on a road trip to figure out who the character is but it was still just whining. I would rate this book lower than his other books.