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Download Avielle of Rhia eBook

by Dia Calhoun

Download Avielle of Rhia eBook
ISBN:
0761455906
Author:
Dia Calhoun
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Skyscape (April 1, 2010)
Pages:
397 pages
EPUB book:
1395 kb
FB2 book:
1995 kb
DJVU:
1457 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
552


Praise from Booklist Magazine. Evocative scenes of Avielle's weaving symbolize her inner journey, and readers will empathize with the girl as she struggles to accept her Dredonian heritage, her magic, and her duty, while weathering prejudice and her own unconscious hatred.

Praise from Booklist Magazine. The pattern Calhoun weaves is rich and complex. About Avielle of Rhia. With her silver skin and silver hair, fifteen-year-old Princess Avielle of Rhia resembles her Dredonian great-great grandmother who practiced evil magic.

AVIELLE OF RHIA by Dia Calhoun is about teenage Princess Avielle. She is a "silver skin," a Rhian with silver coloring like that of her Dredonian neighbors and is shunned for resembling her evil Dredonian great-great grandmother. The entire royal family is wiped out one night by the nasty wizard-priests who rule Dredonia. Avielle escapes and goes into hiding in the home of a weaver and acts as her apprentice, soon discovering that she has a magical gift like many Dredonians.

Avielle of Rhia book. Clearly, I like reading Dia Calhoun creates an intriguing world in Rhia

Avielle of Rhia book. Clearly, I like reading Dia Calhoun creates an intriguing world in Rhia. Avielle's character development is strong, but her journey toward her true self and destiny takes a bit too long, too many tries to learn a single lesson. Reading about weaving is fascinating.

by. Calhoun, Dia. Publication date. Magic, Princesses, Weaving, Prejudices, Fantasy. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on August 31, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Dredonian Rhians are disliked in Rhia, especially Avielle, whose bloodline contains a curse from an ancestor who banished birds forever. Despite her family's disdain for her, Avielle's devastated when they're killed by a terrorist attack that razes the castle. She takes mostly anonymous refuge in a neighborhood of craftspeople and slowly makes friends for the first time. Mentor Gamalda brings out Avielle's magic through weaving.

Since the blood of her her, Dolvoka, had sprung up in Princess Avielle-because she looked Dredonian-would Dolvoka's evil magic spring up in her, too? With her silver skin and silver hair, fifteen-year-old Princess Avielle of Rhia resembles her Dredonian great-great grandmother who practiced evil magic. Everyone in Rhia expects Avielle to turn evil, too. Shunned by those around her, she feels unloved and unable to love others.

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Dia Calhoun - Avielle of Rhia. Dia Cha - Hmong American Concepts of Health (Asian Americans Reconceptualizing Culture, History, Politics). Media Cinema - The Killing Kind Press Book.

Since the blood of her great-great-grandmother, Dolvoka, had sprung up in Princess Avielle-because she looked Dredonian-would Dolvoka's evil magic spring up in her, too?

With her silver skin and silver hair, fifteen-year-old Princess Avielle of Rhia resembles her Dredonian great-great grandmother who practiced evil magic. Everyone in Rhia expects Avielle to turn evil, too. Shunned by those around her, she feels unloved and unable to love others. In addition, Rhia is on the verge of war with Dredonia, which suffers under the rule of evil wizard-priests: the Brethren of the Black Cloaks. They have placed impossible demands upon Rhia, but the king and queen have refused to acquiesce.

One terrible night, the Brethren attack, killing the royal family and hundreds of others. Only Avielle escapes. She must keep her identity secret to avoid death from the enemy. While hiding among the common people, she learns that she has a magical gift for weaving. But will this gift, rooted in her Dredonian blood, lead Avielle to the same evil that possessed her great-great grandmother? Or will it help her free her people from further attacks?

  • Uickabrod
When I was in fourth grade I discovered reading as a refuge from my large, noisy family. I found that I could disappear into a book as though I had been transported to another dimension. Before my mind's eye was only the world within the book. I was seduced by books, by authors, by a good story; and I loved nothing better than the delicious feeling of allowing a tale to carry me along like a passenger on a ship, voyaging toward lands unknown.

I entered reading through science fiction, brought home by my father, who read on the bus to and from work. I quickly discovered the school library, and the Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, and the Land of Oz. When I discovered Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, my journey into the realm of literature was complete: I had become a confirmed reader.

The portals created by Dia Calhoun entice the young reader into kingdoms where the impossible is possible; where the Ugly Duckling really is a swan; where you are Somebody Special but neither you nor anyone else yet suspects. She puts the key into the reader's hand, and the locked door opens as if by magic.

The thing about a book, is that you hold it in your hand and the relative thickness of what you have read and what remains is plain to see. You know the story will end, but with a good book, you don't want it to. But when it does end, there are always more books. Let us hope that Dia Calhoun keeps on writing.

David Lance Goines, October 20, 2006
  • Kezan
AVIELLE OF RHIA by Dia Calhoun is about teenage Princess Avielle. She is a "silver skin," a Rhian with silver coloring like that of her Dredonian neighbors and is shunned for resembling her evil Dredonian great-great grandmother. The entire royal family is wiped out one night by the nasty wizard-priests who rule Dredonia. Avielle escapes and goes into hiding in the home of a weaver and acts as her apprentice, soon discovering that she has a magical gift like many Dredonians. This small family-like community of shop owners provides her a safe place to experiment with her own magic fearing that she will turn evil like her ancestor. But eventually she needs to find the courage to face her magic and come forward as the princess to save her people.

This young adult fantasy novel was quite enjoyable at first. It captured me in the beginning, handed me an interesting character but then dragged out the constant waiting for something to happen. We as the reader know something is going to happen but have to wait a lengthy amount of time for it to happen. When it finally does, it's awkward and anticlimactic because the main character does the opposite of what she is supposed to then changes her mind in the middle of it to bring the "good" and appropriate ending. It was odd.

I'd rate this book at 2. Fair, not quite worth it. I like fantasy novels so much I almost want to rate it higher but it just wasn't very good. The ending was overdone and awkward which seals the low score. A lot of times, the names got in the way of the descriptions. Yet, it is rated for 8 year olds and up so maybe they would find this "coming of age" novel good especially for those who don't feel comfortable in their own skin.
  • Zahisan
Where do I start with this book? There is so much that I would like to say about it. I guess I can start with the first thought that came to mind... Wow! This is one of the few fantasy books that I have ever read that completely engrossed me into its world. Calhoun paints a glorious picture of Avielle's world leaving very little unanswered. The reader understands their religion, their history, their customs.. you name it, Calhoun included it. This aspect is only one of many things that I loved about this book.

The plot was paced well, but not too fast. For this story, this is not a bad thing since I believe that the reader needs to fully understand all aspects of what is going on this world. Avielle (I LOVE this name) is an interesting heroine. She has flaws, but you cannot help but love her. The other characters are wonderful, and add much to the story. The only character I did not fully understand was Edard. Calhoun gives the reader hints about his hatefulness, but never comes right out and explains it. I also would not have minded a bit a romance. The possibility is there for Avielle, but it is never explored.

There are two things (three if you count the cover) that I absolutely loved about this book. First, was Avielle's world, which I already discussed. The other is how Calhoun dealt with racism and prejudice. Both issues are handled flawlessly, and leave the reader with a nice message. This would be a great book to use in middle/early high school classrooms to highlight those issues.

The only question I have about the novel is: Where is the sequel??? The ending leads you to believe that there is much more to explore, and I really, really want to, but Calhoun has not written a sequel yet.

This book is definitely going on my keepers list. It is well written, has a beautifully explored world, great characters, has a great underlying message for its readers. I honestly do not have any thing bad to say about it... except that there is no sequel in site (the book was published in 2006). If you decide to read this, I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.