almediah.fr
» » Dark Eden

Download Dark Eden eBook

by Patrick Arrasmith,Patrick Carman

Download Dark Eden eBook
ISBN:
0062009710
Author:
Patrick Arrasmith,Patrick Carman
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Katherine Tegen Books; Reprint edition (April 24, 2012)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1101 kb
FB2 book:
1150 kb
DJVU:
1387 kb
Other formats
mobi lrf mbr lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
664


Patrick Carman (Author), Patrick Arrasmith (Illustrator). Author Patrick Carman has done something quite different by offering this story as both a complete novel and one that can be approached as a multimedia experience.

Patrick Carman (Author), Patrick Arrasmith (Illustrator). Exploring the word of Fort Eden through audio and video, as well as through the written word, can make each reader's experience an individual one depending on just how much or how little of each of the different media they choose to incorporate into their reading.

Patrick Carman is the New York Times bestselling author of such acclaimed series as the Land of Elyon and Atherton, the teen superhero novel Thirteen Days to Midnight, and the first two books in the Pulse series. A multimedia pioneer, Patrick authored The Black Circle, the fifth title in the 39 Clues series, and the groundbreaking Dark Eden, Skeleton Creek, and Trackers books. An enthusiastic reading advocate, Patrick has visited more than one thousand schools, developed village library projects in Central America, and created author outreach programs for communities. He lives in Walla Walla,.

2 primary works, 3 total works. Fifteen-year-old Will Besting is sent by his.

Patrick's Dark Eden makes a great example of this. He took an especially creepy premise full of questions and unexplained occurrences and gave us a spine-chilling novel. The big plot twist isn't completely impossible to deduce - I'm sure most will guess to a certain extent, but the whole ordeal behind it and sinister feeling throughout the book had me covered in goosebumps the whole way through.

Dark Eden - Patrick Carman. Dark Eden is the first book I’ve ever read by Patrick Carman, although I can assure you it will not be the last. Talk about a thriller! Dark Eden will capture your attention from beginning to end, finding a way beneath your skin. Everyone has a fear, or fears.

Patrick Carman's Dark Eden is a provocative exploration of fear, betrayal, memory, and- ty. Patrick Carman is the New York Times bestselling author of over thirty books, including the acclaimed series the Land of Elyon and Floors and the teen superhero novel Thirteen Days to Midnight. A multimedia pioneer, Patrick authored The Black Circle, the fifth title in the 39 Clues series, and the Dark Eden, Skeleton Creek, Trackers, Fizzopolis, and Voyagers series. An enthusiastic reading advocate, Patrick has visited more than a thousand schools, developed village library projects in Central America, and created author outreach programs for communities.

Patrick Carman (born February 27, 1966 in Salem, Oregon) is an American writer. Carman is a graduate of Willamette University. In his twenties, Carman founded an ad agency, then ran it for a decade, overseeing a staff of eight and art directing projects for the health, technology, and film industries. He sold the agency in 1999 and founded a technology company that grew into a multimillion-dollar business. Carman sold his second company in 2003 and began writing books for young adults and children

Uncorrected e-proof-not for sale.

Uncorrected e-proof-not for sale. HarperCollins Publishers.

Patrick Carman books, tours, and general info

Patrick Carman books, tours, and general info. Patrick Carman Books. November 25, 2019 ·. The CLAW has released on Audible - seven episodes, all based on the 3:15 series of stories. These turned out really great - a fun mix of humor and scares for kids of all ages.

When Will Besting approaches Fort Eden for the first time, he knows something isn't right. With more terrifying secrets at every turn, he discovers a hidden fear deep inside himself, a dark mystery a thousand years in the making, and the unexpected girl of his dreams. But can he save everyone from the dangers of Fort Eden before it's too late?

Patrick Carman's Dark Eden is a provocative exploration of fear, betrayal, the power of memory, and the mystery of love.

  • Mr.Bean
When I started this book, I really wasn't sure what to expect. A psychological thriller, of course. A lot to do with fears and curing them. I was expecting the unexpected though, and that's exactly what this book gave me. At the very end, it was a huge "WHAT JUST HAPPENED?!?" moment.

I really liked the way the fears were "cured" - I thought it was really interesting to see who was afraid of what, and why. And I also really enjoyed the Masque of the Red Death tie-in. I thought it gave the whole novel an interesting twist, especially with how it ends. Because Rainsford - what in the world is up with that guy? I'm hoping Carman delves deeper into his character in the next book. Mrs. Goring too. I really want to know more about her past, and why she even has the association with Rainsford that she does. Especially knowing how and why he cures the teenagers.

Although I initially found Will to be a very strange character (since his fear is not revealed until about halfway through the book), I actually found myself liking and even feeling sorry for him by the time it comes for him to be cured. Especially after finding out why he fears what he does. I really liked the way that Carman had that happen, especially since Will spends most of the novel hidden away in a room by himself watching and listening to the other kids.

I'm pretty excited to read the next novel in the series, since I think that the "new and improved" Will Besting will be a very interesting character. Having him finally able to live without being crippled by his (not so ir)rational fear will bring out quite a lot in him that I think was lacking in this installment.

Overall, I think I would give this book a 3/5. Not exceptional, but definitely intriguing and interesting enough to keep my attention long enough for me to finish it in one sitting. I'd probably recommend it to someone who was a fan of mysteries, with a little bit of the fantastical and the thriller thrown in. Also, to someone with a very open mind. You have to be pretty accepting of some weird things to have this book work for you.
  • Diab
Seven teenagers, each suffering from a crippling fear, are taken to a remote facility out in the woods somewhere. It's called Fort Eden, apparently because it used to be some kind of military outpost. The book's hero, 15-year-old Will, slips away from the group after they arrive, hiding out in an underground bunker he discovers within the complex. He finds a bomb shelter with monitors that allow him to view the progress the other six are making in getting "cured" at the hands of the mysterious Dr. Rainsford. This YA novel, Dark Eden, had some success at creating a scary, creepy atmosphere, and the idea of how the "cures" are conducted was an original one. But as I read further into the book, I began thinking of the problem I eventually had with the TV show "Lost," that too many mysteries were established without enough answers being revealed. That led to the frustrating feeling of being strung along by the show's creators. There's a similar situation in Dark Eden. Although eventually most everything IS explained before the book's end (in relatively mind-blowing fashion), getting to that point was a slow and somewhat annoying process. Also, once Will observed the first "cure" taking place, I knew that I would have to read through at least five more similar scenes (not counting Will's own "cure"). Sure enough, while there were variations (mainly that each subject's fear was different), the "cure" scenes did get a bit repetitive. In the end, this was a fairly middle-of-the-road YA novel; not the best YA novel I've read in recent years, but far from the worst.
  • Hellstaff
Just how far would you go to cure yourself of your darkest fears? What price would you be willing to pay?

Fort Eden promises a cure for even the most incurable of phobias. A cure that will take you to the darkest depths of your fear, making you confront what terrorizes you the most.

But in the end, if you make it through and the cure doesn't kill you, you will be able to live a normal life. Free of the crippling dread that once left you paralyzed.

But at what cost? How much of yourself would you be willing to give up to be free? And would it still be worth it if you knew just what dark purposes were achieved in order for you to be cured?

If living free of your worst nightmares is worth any price, then welcome to Fort Eden....

***

Dark Eden is a gripping story that will draw readers into the mystery of Fort Eden and the seven teens who are sent there to confront and overcome their fears.

As each piece of the puzzle is slowly revealed about this remote facility that promises a cure to what seem to be incurable phobias, new questions arise, leaving readers to guess as to just who Rainsford is and how the supposed cures really work.

When Will Besting and the six other patients - Ben, Kate, Alex, Connor, Marisa and Avery - first arrive at Fort Eden, Will releases he just can't go through with it. So, as the others head to the Fort, Will takes off, figuring he can hide out until the week is over.

While he does have provisions that can sustain him for the week, what he fails to realize is that the nights are extremely cold. So when he gets the opportunity to sneak into the bunker that is adjacent to the facility, he takes a chance.

And what he discovers in the basement of the bunker is both fascinating and chilling - a bomb shelter with monitors that allow him to watch the other patients as they receive their cures. So, as one by one each of the patients undergoes the process that supposedly cures them, Will watches unnoticed. Hidden away in the depths of the bunker, he is a voyeur to all that is happening.

The more he sees, the more he begins to question just what is going on. And in his attempt to find out the secret behind the cures and what Fort Eden really is, he may just become its next victim.

Author Patrick Carman has done something quite different by offering this story as both a complete novel and one that can be approached as a multimedia experience.

Exploring the word of Fort Eden through audio and video, as well as through the written word, can make each reader's experience an individual one depending on just how much or how little of each of the different media they choose to incorporate into their reading.

While choosing to include some, or all, of these extras into the story does enhance the overall effect, it is not required to enjoy this book. Told entirely in the first person from Will Besting's perspective, it's as if readers are experiencing the horrors of Fort Eden right along with Will.

Dark Eden is a fast-paced and captivating story with a twist at the end that readers just might not see coming.