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Download Ash eBook

by Malinda Lo

Download Ash eBook
ISBN:
0316040096
Author:
Malinda Lo
Category:
Science Fiction & Fantasy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; 1 edition (September 1, 2009)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1323 kb
FB2 book:
1149 kb
DJVU:
1555 kb
Other formats
lrf lit lit txt
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
895


Except as permitted under the .

Except as permitted under the . Little, Brown and Company. 237 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10017.

I took Ash by Malinda Lo with me on a trip to Germany in October. Malinda has this unbelievable talent for detail and atmospheric setting. She captures the very essence of the world she created. Turned out to be a good choice. The atmosphere, setting, and style of this book all felt very German to me. It's a retelling of the Cinderella story except that Ash's love interests are a male fairy of the dark and tortured variety (you know a real underhill fairy) and a female huntress of pagan rights old world inclination ~ the prince is mere side character. I just felt like I was there.

Ash feels pulled between two worlds - the fairy realm, where a haughty prince named Sidhean waits for permission to possess her, and the charmed hours she spends with Kaisa. This debut, a retelling of Cinderella in which the heroine falls in love with a beautiful huntress rather than a prince, should establish Lo as a gifted storyteller. Lo's prose is beautiful, her descriptions lush.

Ash by Malinda Lo (2010-10-05) Paperback – 1800. by. Malinda Lo; (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Ash is a young adult fantasy lesbian novel by Malinda Lo first published in 2009. It is a reworking of the Cinderella fairy tale that reimagines the title character, Ash, as a lesbian teenager. The novel centers around the familiar story of Cinderella, her father recently remarried, and lamenting the misery of her new life with stepsisters and a step mother. The twist arrives when Ash falls in love with the King's respected Huntress Kaisa, after she has made a commitment to dark fairy prince Sidhean.

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson Discussion - Продолжительность: 17:35 Jean Bookishthoughts Recommended for you.

Read online books written by Malinda Lo in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Ash, Adaptation, Huntress at ReadAnyBook.

For example, for most of the book Ash is a character who suppresses the grief and hope and is all anger and depression and how could she not?

Title: Ash. Author: Malinda Lo. Genre: YA (Fantasy/ GLBT). Publisher: Little, Brown, Hodder Children’s books Publishing Date: September 1, 2009/ March 2010 Hardcover: 272 pages. Stand alone or series: Stand alone. Summary: In the wake of her father’s death, Ash is left at the mercy of her cruel stepmother. For example, for most of the book Ash is a character who suppresses the grief and hope and is all anger and depression and how could she not? She is a victim of abuse. From a very young age she knows nothing of being loved or cared for.

The haunting, romantic lesbian retelling of Cinderella and modern queer classic by award-winning author Malinda Lo-now with an introduction by Holly Black, a letter from the author, a Q&A, and more In the wake of her father's death, Ash is left at the mercy of her cruel stepmother. Consumed with grief, her only joy comes by the light of the dying hearth fire, rereading the fairy tales her mother once told her.

Send us books! Upford Network ℅ Tom Zalatnai PO Box 22585 Monkland PO Montreal, Quebec H4A 3T4 Canada.

We talk a lot about writing and adapting fairy tales, but also about crushes, astrology, and whether or not the fairy godmother represents death? Apologies to all the fantasy fans, because Sania and Teffer don’t have the fantasy chops and occasionally get a little tangled up in world building. Send us books! Upford Network ℅ Tom Zalatnai PO Box 22585 Monkland PO Montreal, Quebec H4A 3T4 Canada.

The haunting, romantic lesbian retelling of Cinderella and modern queer classic by award-winning author Malinda Lo--now with an introduction by Holly Black, a letter from the author, a Q&A, and more!In the wake of her father's death, Ash is left at the mercy of her cruel stepmother. Consumed with grief, her only joy comes by the light of the dying hearth fire, rereading the fairy tales her mother once told her. In her dreams, someday the fairies will steal her away. When she meets the dark and dangerous fairy Sidhean, she believes that her wish may be granted.The day that Ash meets Kaisa, the King's Huntress, her heart begins to change. Instead of chasing fairies, Ash learns to hunt with Kaisa. Their friendship, as delicate as a new bloom, reawakens Ash's capacity for love--and her desire to live. But Sidhean has already claimed Ash for his own, and she must make a choice between fairy tale dreams and true love.Entrancing and empowering, Ash beautifully unfolds the connections between life and love, and solitude and death, where transformation can come from even the deepest grief.
  • LivingCross
This book was the most disappointing young adult book I've read all year. The author sets up a great love story between the main character and a mysterious young man. The author demolishes this perfect work by surprising the reader and introducing a new intrest mid book. I was so enraptured by this growing love with the young man, it was a complete upset by introducing the new love intrest. It was like pulling teeth just to finish the book. Especially since the new love intrest was a member of the same sex. Also, the story was so far removed from the disney version of Cinderella and even the traditional story; the reader should not expect it to be even close.
  • Water
Here's the deal: I work in a bookstore. As a twenty-something (gay) woman, I more often than not inwardly cringe at the girls who ask me to point them towards new books, and specify that they like things like Twilight. Lo's debut novel, Ash, isn't Twlight. It's the anti-Twilight. And that's exactly why it's so good.

Even though it's a retelling of Cinderella, Ash is more a coming-of-age story than a sappy romance. Torn between the memories of her dead parents and the reality of her cruel stepmother, Aisling finds her escape in the woods she loves and the dangerous fairies that live there. Until she meets Kaisa, the King's huntress, Ash lives as an abused servant by day and a bewitched victim of fairy magic by night.

Now, if this was Twilight, Aisling would fall hopelessly in love with some abusive, mystical stalker who she is "inexplicably drawn to" (I swear, that's the exact wording they use for 90% publisher copies of the YA fantasy-romance dreck pumped out today like candy). But this atmospheric and eerie plot leads to a surprising conclusion -- much different than the classic Cinderella -- but ultimately much more convincing!

The romance in Ash is less purple prose or a storm of clichés and more poignant and touching -- based on friendship, respect and freedom, not an unhealthy attraction to danger. I couldn't put this one down, and I'm glad I didn't: the ending is utterly satisfying and sweet (spoiler: oh, and gay).

As for me, I really enjoy pointing Twilight-addled preteens towards such subversive literature. There's something deliciously ironic with the fact that a healthy, lesbian relationship in teen literature is more controversial than the dozens of abusive, incomprehensible, poorly written "novels" for teens pumped out each day.

Parents: skip Twilight and buy Ash. Unless you'd rather your girls identify with useless empty female protagonists who flirt with death rather than proactive, but gay, female protagonists who find nothing sexy about killing yourself for the sake of boys who equate violence with love.
  • Paster
Lo has created an interesting premise in this reworking of Cinderella's story. There is absolutely no question of that. The problem is that there was too much going on. Was it a faerie story or was it a story about a girl awakening to the fact that she could be in love with another woman? The broad overview of both stories left me feeling as though Ash was disconnected from both potential romances; there wasn't any passion in either. Given that, I didn't feel the conflict Ash was supposed to be experiencing as she worked to decide which life and which partner to choose.

The latter made me wish we'd had a story without that conflict at all; that it was either Ash in the faerie tale or Ash awakening to her lesbianism all the way through. I understood completely the reason for having both in the story but for me that conflict muddled the eventual love story. Particularly since we also dealt with the overpowering step-mother, the annoying plotting step sister, and bits and pieces of the prince choosing his bride from all eligible ladies of the land. As I said, lots going on.

The faerie story aspect was intriguing and beautifully written. Of the whole story it was that area that drew me in as a reader the most. I wanted to know more about it and see more of it. I wanted Ash to tell us more of the history and interact with its inhabitants much more than she did. The sections where Ash was in the Wood and in that faerie land were so vivid I was excited to experience them.

In the end this book may not have been for me but it was none the less a book that I would encourage anyone interested in experiencing a retelling of Cinderella's story to pick up.