almediah.fr
» » Rapture Practice

Download Rapture Practice eBook

by Aaron Hartzler

Download Rapture Practice eBook
ISBN:
031609465X
Author:
Aaron Hartzler
Category:
Social Issues
Language:
English
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; 1 edition (April 9, 2013)
Pages:
400 pages
EPUB book:
1835 kb
FB2 book:
1658 kb
DJVU:
1273 kb
Other formats
mobi docx txt lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
750


Rapture Practice follows Hartzler's life from the time he discovers his passion for acting at four years of age to his high school graduation.

Rapture Practice follows Hartzler's life from the time he discovers his passion for acting at four years of age to his high school graduation. Hartzler writes candidly about his religious upbringing, including all of the wonderful parts about his family traditions, knowing God's grace, and growing up in a loving family.

Rapture Practice book. When Aaron Hartzler was little, he couldn’t wait for the The Rapture: that moment when Jesus would come down from the clouds to whisk him and his family up to heaven. But as he turns sixteen, Aaron grows more curious about all the things his family forsakes for the Lord. He begins to What happens when the person you’re becoming isn’t the one your family wants you to be?

Every day after geometry, seventh period is Bible class. Mr. Kroger teaches us evangelical theology, and we memorize entire passages of the Bible for a grade in our verse quiz each week.

Every day after geometry, seventh period is Bible class. Kroger also shows videos in class from time to time. Today’s video features Dr. James Dobson, a Christian psychologist and author who founded a a ministry based in Colorado Springs called Focus on the Family

Critically acclaimed memoirist Aaron Hartzler, author of Rapture Practice, takes an unflinching look at what happens to a small town when some of its residents commit a terrible crime.

Critically acclaimed memoirist Aaron Hartzler, author of Rapture Practice, takes an unflinching look at what happens to a small town when some of its residents commit a terrible crime. Critically acclaimed memoirist Aaron Hartzler, author of Rapture Practice, takes an unflinching look at what happens to a small town when some of its residents commit a terrible crime.

Sometimes salvation is found in the strangest places: a true story. Aaron Hartzler grew up in a home where he was taught that at any moment the Rapture could happen. That Jesus might come down in the twinkling of an eye and scoop Aaron and his family up to heaven. As a kid, Aaron was thrilled by the idea that every moment of every day might be his last one on planet Earth.

Rapture Practice (Paperback). Aaron Hartzler (author) Aaron Hartzler grew up in a home where he was taught that at any moment . Wherever you weigh in on the religion scale, this book will speak to yo. Aaron Hartzler (author).

Interview with aaron hartzler. Some of us would delight in taking a hammer to our questionable adolescent taste in music. Such is one of many scenarios.

Город: Los Angeles, CAПодписчиков: 5 ты. себе: Author of RAPTURE PRACTICE and WHAT WE . . себе: Author of RAPTURE PRACTICE and WHAT WE SAW. Feminist homo who wants the 2nd Amendment repealed. I love, thawk, rollercoasters, cake, and the KC Royals.

Aaron Hartzler's memoir about reconciling his parents' strict Baptist rules with his own thoughts about God and .

Aaron Hartzler's memoir about reconciling his parents' strict Baptist rules with his own thoughts about God and religion. Posted on May 22, 2013 by Cindy Hudson. Aaron Hartzler grew up in Kansas City as the oldest son in a strict Baptist family.

Aaron Hartzler grew up in a home where he was taught that at any moment Jesus might come down in the twinkling of an eye, and scoop his whole family up to Heaven. As a kid, Aaron was thrilled by the idea that each day might be his last one on planet Earth. He couldn't wait to blastoff and join Jesus in the sky!But as he turns sixteen, Aaron finds himself more and more attached to his life on Earth, and curious about all the things his family forsakes for the Lord. He begins to realize he doesn't want the Rapture to happen, just yet; not before he sees his first movie, stars in the school play, or has his first kiss. Before long, Aaron makes the plunge from conflicted do-gooder to full-fledged teen rebel.Whether he's sneaking out, making out, or at the piano playing hymns with a hangover, Aaron learns a few lessons that can't be found in the Bible. He discovers the best friends aren't always the ones your mom and dad approve of, and the tricky part about believing is that no one can do it for you.In this funny and heartfelt coming of age memoir, debut author Aaron Hartzler recalls his teenage journey to find the person he is without losing the family who loves him. It's a story about losing your faith, finding your place, and learning your very own truth--which is always stranger than fiction.
  • Snowskin
Aaron Hartzler grew up in an extremely conservative Christian family that did not have a tv, go to movies or listen to music. Even contemporary Christian rock because "you can't mix God's words with the Devil's beat." However, as he gets older he begins to question these beliefs. He begins to love rock music because it makes him feel happy and he can't understand how that can be a sin. Aaron participates in church services, teaches Good News children's group, acts in his Christian private school 's elaborately staged dramas all the while questioning the logic of his parents' strongest held beliefs, but ultimately finding his own way to peace and understanding with his family. All this is presented in a humorous (I can't count how many times I laughed out loud.) and sincere way to become one of the best memoir of "finding religion" that I have ever read.

I also grew up in a religious Christian family and though my parents, thankfully, weren't so strict, I have often come into contact with people who believe in the ways of Aaron's parents and school administration. I could so identify with Aaron because his reaction to so much of what he saw in his life was my reaction. I often felt I was reading a more articulate version of my experience. The book is extremely well written for someone who doesn't have a background in writing (He's an actor and musician), but he manages to express so much of what I felt as a teenager in an engaging and intelligent way. I had and to this day, have many of the same questions that Aaron grappled with: if God knows every decision we will make before we are born, then why give us free will, if Jesus turned water to wine, then why is it not allowed to drink a glass of wine, how can a serial killer who asks for salvation days before execution make it into heaven while a good person in the jungles of Africa who didn't have the luck to hear about the Gospel won't make it into heaven to name a few. Aaron didn't really have anyone to whom he could turn to ask questions. Aaron, today an out homosexual as far as I have been able to understand in the book's press, grapples with sexual identity, although that is more or less only hinted at in this book. I get the feeling that that will be the subject of a sequel to this book. I would be very interested in reading this story and how his family accepted this.

I would recommend this book to teens and adults alike, religious and non-religious because it is such a well written journey of faith. Even though Aaron ultimately rejects his parents' version of Christianity, he is never bitter or derisive.
  • Bukus
Contrary to the blurb on the cover, this has nothing to do with "growing up gay." The author is firmly heterosexual throughout the book (which takes him as far as college). I kept waiting for him to discover his gay sexuality, but no luck, other than his occasional expressions of curiosity and admiration for well-muscled young men. It's quite well written, and gives a good description of life in a cult so extreme that movies and TV are forbidden and Christian rock is looked on as a tool of Satan. The high (or low) point in the book comes when the father beats his son and then asks forgiveness: not for the beating but for the sin of anger. And he invites the son to beat him in return! I'll draw the curtain of modesty on this scene. At the end of the book the young man is cheerfully headed off to Bible college. In a brief postscript he talks about having rejected his abusive family and crazy religion, but this was apparently only years later.
  • doesnt Do You
I pre-ordered this book after reading an interview with the author a week or two before it was released. His situation seemed so similar to what I experienced growing up in the same general part of the country during the same general time period (our ages are less than five years apart), with parents who were very similar to the author's. When the ebook automatically and unexpectedly arrived at midnight on the April 9 release date, I thought I'd read a chapter or two before going to bed. Instead, I read about 150 pages, and have now finished the entire 390-page book in just two days.

The author's writing is spare and beautiful; very matter-of-fact yet strangely insightful. I also very much enjoyed his witty take on practices and beliefs that I recall very clearly from my childhood and adolescence. And I suspect that readers who don't share this common background will nevertheless find the book worthwhile and useful in understanding a certain way of living (or being raised) that is really quite odd and inexplicable.

My only complaint, and it's a slight one, is that the book ends too early in the author's life (high school graduation). I'd like to know how the story continues -- how the character at the end of the story became the author who could write this tender, reflective autobiography. So, the author should write a sequel. I'd also love to know what his parents think of the book (will they read it? discuss it with him?).